Black women abolitionists : a study in activism, 1828-1860 / Shirley J. Yee.

By: Yee, Shirley J, 1959-Material type: TextTextPublisher: Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, c1992Edition: 1st edDescription: xii, 204 p. : ill. ; 24 cmISBN: 0870497359 (cl. : alk. paper); 9780870497353 (cl. : alk. paper); 0870497367 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780870497360 (pbk. : alk. paper)Subject(s): Women abolitionists -- United States -- History -- 19th century | African American women -- History -- 19th century | Antislavery movements -- United States | United States -- Social conditions -- To 1865DDC classification: 305.48/896073 LOC classification: E449 | .Y44 1992Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
1. Kinship, Friendship, and Community -- 2. Black Women and the Cult of True Womanhood -- 3. Working for the Welfare of Our Race -- 4. Weathering the Storms -- 5. Breaking Customs -- 6. Sowing the Seeds of Black Feminism
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E449 .Y44 1992 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000852459

Includes bibliographical references (p. 184-198) and index.

1. Kinship, Friendship, and Community -- 2. Black Women and the Cult of True Womanhood -- 3. Working for the Welfare of Our Race -- 4. Weathering the Storms -- 5. Breaking Customs -- 6. Sowing the Seeds of Black Feminism

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In a detailed morphology of free black women's experiences in antebellum reform, historian Yee shifts the genesis of radical antislavery from the Garrisonians to blacks and finds free black women present at the creation. Women abolitionists joined together in community building, political organizing, and building private and professional female networks. In doing so, they discovered that to gain a public audience they needed simultaneously to act like ``true women'' in working for moral reforms such as temperance and education while also stepping out of conventional ``middle-class'' female roles to speak and write against slavery. Such activism led toward women's rights, yet blacks abjured association with white reformers unsupportive of racial uplift. Racism among reformers propelled black women reformers toward separate action and identity. Yee's complex argument demands serious attention from those trying to unravel the contradicions in the reform tradition. Recommended for university libraries.-- Randall M. Miller, St. Joseph's Univ., Philadelphia (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Black women, North and South, helped to destroy the ^D["peculiar institution,^D]" especially those who gambled their lives as operatives in the Underground Railroad--of whom only Harriet Tubman has attained adequate recognition. The story of their deeds is integral to knowledge of the antislavery impulse; unfortunately, that story remains to be told. Instead, Yee has fashioned a narrative burdened by self-limits and by the reigning vogue in deconstructionist feminist ideology. Focusing primarily on exemplars of free African American Victorian society up North, active in antislavery work when more pressing demands of family and status permitted, Yee has concentrated on a group that collectively freed fewer slaves than did Tubman on a single odyssey into the Chesapeake. Even this story, interesting and peripherally relevant in its own right, is smothered by theoretical homage to the deconstructionist triad of race, class, and gender, exemplified by such essays as ^D["Black Women and the Cult of True Womanhood.^D]" Thus, the volume contributes to feminist historiography, but provides little more than an appetizer for students of the African American struggle for liberation. Advanced undergraduate; graduate.

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