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Hesiod, the Homeric hymns and Homerica / with an English translation by Hugh G. Evelyn-White.

By: Hesiod.
Contributor(s): Evelyn-White, Hugh G. (Hugh Gerard), d. 1924.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Loeb classical library: Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1914, t.p. 1977Description: xlviii, 657 p. ; 17 cm.ISBN: 0674990633; 9780674990630.Uniform titles: Works. English & Latin. 1914 Subject(s): Epic poetry, Greek | Greek poetry -- Translations into English | English poetry -- Translations from GreekAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Hesiod, the Homeric hymns and Homerica.DDC classification: 880 Other classification: 18.43
Contents:
Hesiod -- The Homeric hymns -- The epigrams of Homer -- The epic cycle -- Homerica -- The contest of Homer and Hesiod.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PA3612 .H6 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000071969
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PA3612 .H6 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100201730
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PA3612 .H5 1926 V.4 Herodotus / PA3612 .H5 1926 V.4 Herodotus / PA3612 .H6 Hesiod, the Homeric hymns and Homerica / PA3612 .H6 Hesiod, the Homeric hymns and Homerica / PA3612 .J62 1998 V.12-13 Jewish antiquities / PA3612 .J62 1998 V.1-3 Jewish antiquities / PA3612 .J62 1998 V.14-15 Jewish antiquities /

Greek and English on opposite pages.

Includes bibliographical references (p. xliii-xlviii) and index.

Hesiod -- The Homeric hymns -- The epigrams of Homer -- The epic cycle -- Homerica -- The contest of Homer and Hesiod.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

The poet Hesiod tells us that his father gave up sea-trading and moved from Ascra to Boeotia, that as he himself tended sheep on Mount Helicon the Muses commanded him to sing of the gods, and that he won a tripod for a funeral song at Chalcis. <p> The poems credited to him with certainty are: the Theogony, an attempt to bring order into the otherwise chaotic material of Greek mythology through genealogies and anecdotes about the gods; and The Works and Days, a wise sermon addressed to his brother Perses as a result of a dispute over their dead father's estate. This latter work presents the injustice of the world with mythological examples and memorable images, and concludes with a collection of folk wisdom. <p> Uncertain attributions are the Shield of Heracles and the Catalogue of Women. Hesiod is a didactic and individualistic poet who is often compared and contrasted with Homer, as both are representative of early epic style. "Hesiod is earth-bound and dun colored; indeed part of his purpose is to discredit the brilliance and the ideals of heroism glorified in the homeric tradition. But Hesiod, too, is poetry, though of a different order. . . " (Moses Hadas, N.Y. Times). <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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