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Encyclopedia of American social history / Mary Kupiec Cayton, Elliott J. Gorn, Peter W. Williams, editors.

Contributor(s): Cayton, Mary Kupiec | Gorn, Elliott J, 1951- | Williams, Peter W.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Toronto : New York : Scribner ; Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; Maxwell Macmillan International, c1993Description: 3 v. (xix, 2653 p.) : ill. ; 29 cm.ISBN: 0684192462 (set : alk. paper); 9780684192468 (set : alk. paper); 0684194554 (v. 1 : alk. paper); 9780684194554 (v. 1 : alk. paper); 0684194562 (v. 2 : alk. paper); 9780684194561 (v. 2 : alk. paper); 0684194570 (v. 3 : alk. paper); 9780684194578 (v. 3 : alk. paper).Subject(s): United States -- Social conditions -- Encyclopedias | United States -- Social life and customs -- Encyclopedias | Social history -- EncyclopediasAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Encyclopedia of American social history.DDC classification: 301/.0973 Other classification: 15.85 Also issued online.
Contents:
v. 1. Periods of social change ; Methods and contexts ; The construction of social identity ; Processes of social change -- v. 2. Ethnic and racial subcultures ; Regionalism and regional subcultures ; Space and place ; Patterns of everyday life ; Work and labor -- v. 3. Popular culture and recreation ; Family history ; Social problems, social control, and social protest ; Science, medicine, and technology ; Education and literacy.
Summary: A combination of the scholarship of historians, and work in ethnology, gender study, geography, literature, religion, anthropology, and sociology.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Reference Book University of Texas At Tyler
Reference Area
HN57 .E58 1993 V.1 (Browse shelf) Not for loan 0000001000454
Reference Book University of Texas At Tyler
Reference Area
HN57 .E58 1993 V.2 (Browse shelf) Not for loan 0000001000462
Reference Book University of Texas At Tyler
Reference Area
HN57 .E58 1993 V.3 (Browse shelf) Not for loan 0000001000470

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Also issued online.

v. 1. Periods of social change ; Methods and contexts ; The construction of social identity ; Processes of social change -- v. 2. Ethnic and racial subcultures ; Regionalism and regional subcultures ; Space and place ; Patterns of everyday life ; Work and labor -- v. 3. Popular culture and recreation ; Family history ; Social problems, social control, and social protest ; Science, medicine, and technology ; Education and literacy.

A combination of the scholarship of historians, and work in ethnology, gender study, geography, literature, religion, anthropology, and sociology.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 10 Up-An encyclopedia that includes 180 well-written, scholarly essays in 14 thematic sections. Each selection, averaging 10-16 pages, provides a historical overview of a period or aspect of American life and culture, or of the methods and approaches employed in studying it. Each concludes with a useful bibliography. Articles on slavery, racism, alcoholism, sexual orientation, and numerous entries on family life, popular culture, and periods of social change will be of particular interest and value to students. While the scope is broad, it is not exhaustive-the essay on ``Latin Americans'' discusses Mexican and Central Americans but not South Americans, and none of the articles under ``Ethnic & Racial Subcultures'' address the cultures of Caribbean Americans. Still, this is an impressive compilation. Clear print, see-also references, a complex table of contents in each volume, and an extensive index facilitate use.-Daryl Grabarek, Brooklyn Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

The editors, with nearly 200 contributors, have produced a monumental and extremely useful synthesis of American social history. They note that "the range of subjects and approaches is daunting," to which 14 thematic sections and 180 essays attest. Contributions by historians and scholars from ethnology, geography, literature, religion, anthropology, and sociology discuss the major issues such as gender, race, ethnicity, religion, social class, and sexual and political orientation that have dominated historical inquiry since the late 1960s. The section titles--Periods of Social Change; Methods and Context; The Construction of Social Identity; Processes of Social Change; Ethnic and Racial Subcultures; Regionalism and Regional Subcultures; Space and Place; Patterns of Everyday Life; Work and Labor; Popular Culture and Recreation; Family History; Social Problems, Social Control, and Social Protest; Science, Medicine and Technology; and Education and Literacy--convey the breadth of coverage. The longest section, reflecting the considerable interest in popular culture, includes essays ranging from sports, travel, and amusement parks to rock music, humor, and journalism. Other sections include essays on such theoretical matters as modernization theory, quantification, and poststructural theory. The typical essay runs 13 double-column pages and is followed by an extensive bibliography of books and articles as well as see also references to other essays. Maps, graphs, and tables enhance the text, and the essays on architecture and housing are accompanied by photographs. The 92-page index, in Volume 3, refers to both page number and column. It is extremely detailed, with extensive subheadings, and includes not only subjects, people, and place-names but also organizations and institutions and titles of songs, films, and books. The vast range of this work is revealed by a glance at the first column, where one finds entries for abolitionism, abortion, acid rain, acid rock, Acoma Indians, ACT-UP (Aids Coalition to Unleash Power), and Roy Acuff. A useful feature of the index is a footer on each page indicating the inclusive pagination of each volume. The 8.5-by-11 page size and sheer bulk and weight of each volume, one of which exceeds 1,000 pages, makes the set somewhat cumbersome to use. Perhaps four volumes would have been a handier format. The sixth title in the "Scribner American Civilization Series," this will undoubtedly take its place among the classic reference works in American history and should be acquired by all libraries. J. D. Haskell Jr.; College of William and Mary

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