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Great expectations / by Charles Dickens ; with 21 illustrations by F.W. Pailthorpe ; and an introd. by Frederick Page.

By: Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870.
Contributor(s): Pailthorpe, F. W. (Frederick W.) | Page, Frederick, 1879-1962.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: The Oxford illustrated Dickens.Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1987, c1953Description: xvi, 460 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.ISBN: 0192545116; 9780192545114.Subject(s): Young men -- England -- Fiction | England -- Social life and customs -- 19th century -- FictionDDC classification: 823.8 Also issued online.Summary: The development of Philip (Pip) Pirrip's character after he learns of 'great expectations' of wealth from a mysterious source shows that pride comes before a fall. But he is not the only character to learn from his errors: Estella, a young protegee of the half-deranged Miss Havisham, has used her beauty as a weapon and she suffers too.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PR4560 .A1 1987 (Browse shelf) Available

Also issued online.

The development of Philip (Pip) Pirrip's character after he learns of 'great expectations' of wealth from a mysterious source shows that pride comes before a fall. But he is not the only character to learn from his errors: Estella, a young protegee of the half-deranged Miss Havisham, has used her beauty as a weapon and she suffers too.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

With a major new film adaptation of Great Expectations coming soon to the big screen, now is a good moment for an updated audio edition of this classic story of an orphan boy's rise from poverty to gentility, thanks to the help of an unknown patron. One of Dickens's finest works, it is, all at once, the heartrending tale of unrequited love, a deep mystery with a shocking resolution, and an often exciting action story. VERDICT Simon Prebble's powerful narration brings Dickens's colorful dialog alive and will make the book's 18-plus hours seem so many minutes. During this bicentennial year of Dickens's birth, this audiobook should be a slam-dunk acquisition for most libraries. [See "Charles Dickens: Our Mutual Friend," LJ 2/15/12, for more Dickens titles in audio.]-R. Kent Rasmussen, Thousand Oaks, CA (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up-This classic tale is condensed into a fast-paced format that, in the Original Text, still contains much of Dickens's original phrasing. The language remains the real charm of the story-Pip is not a terribly likable character, as he is far too concerned with station and class and is too easily ashamed of his past-and the adaptation works wonderfully as an abridgment accompanied by expressive artwork that accurately depicts the era. Notes at the end offer more information about Dickens's time and the political climate that form the context for the novel. Quick Text is a plain-language translation that reads well and is likely to attract a more reluctant audience. While the adaptation of the story is still good, it is a shame to lose the author's original words; the art makes the action and situations clear enough without further watering down the text. Unfortunately, the Quick Text cover is much more intriguing than the Original Text. The latter is recommended for libraries looking to expand their graphic-novel selections into the classics, with the former recommended only where reluctant readers are the majority of the comics audience.-Alana Abbott, James Blackstone Memorial Library, Branford, CT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Charles Dickens, perhaps the best British novelist of the Victorian era, was born in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England on February 7, 1812. His happy early childhood was interrupted when his father was sent to debtors' prison, and young Dickens had to go to work in a factory at age twelve. Later, he took jobs as an office boy and journalist before publishing essays and stories in the 1830s.

His first novel, The Pickwick Papers, made him a famous and popular author at the age of twenty-five. Subsequent works were published serially in periodicals and cemented his reputation as a master of colorful characterization, and as a harsh critic of social evils and corrupt institutions. His many books include Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Bleak House, Great Expectations, Little Dorrit, A Christmas Carol, and A Tale of Two Cities.

Dickens married Catherine Hogarth in 1836, and the couple had nine children before separating in 1858 when he began a long affair with Ellen Ternan, a young actress. Despite the scandal, Dickens remained a public figure, appearing often to read his fiction. He died in 1870, leaving his final novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, unfinished.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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