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Writings, 1902-1910 / William James.

By: James, William, 1842-1910.
Contributor(s): Kuklick, Bruce, 1941-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: The Library of America: 38.Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Literary Classics of the United States : Distributed to the trade in the U.S. and Canada by Viking, c1987Description: 1379 p. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 0940450380; 9780940450387.Uniform titles: Selections. 1987 Subject(s): Philosophy | Pragmatism | Experience (Religion) | Psychology, Religious | ReligionDDC classification: 191 LOC classification: B945 | .J21 1987
Contents:
Varieties of religious experience --- Pragmatism --- A pluralistic universe --- The meaning of truth --- Some problems of philosophy --- Essays.
Summary: Examines the role of religion in human lives, the nature of the universe, truth, pragmatism, war, politics, and metaphysics.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
B945 .J21 1987 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000374918

"Bruce Kuklick wrote the notes and selected the texts for this volume"--5th prelim. p.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 1350-1379) and index.

Varieties of religious experience --- Pragmatism --- A pluralistic universe --- The meaning of truth --- Some problems of philosophy --- Essays.

Examines the role of religion in human lives, the nature of the universe, truth, pragmatism, war, politics, and metaphysics.

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School Library Journal Review

YA This volume contains the texts of five books and 19 essays, representing all of James' major work between 1902 and 1910. This latest addition to the series may fill a gap in some collections. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

William James, oldest of five children (including Henry James and Alice James) in the extraordinary James family, was born in New York City on January 11, 1842. He has had a far-reaching influence on writers and thinkers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Broadly educated by private tutors and through European travel, James initially studied painting. During the Civil War, however, he turned to medicine and physiology, attended Harvard medical school, and became interested in the workings of the mind. <p> His text, The Principles of Psychology (1890), presents psychology as a science rather than a philosophy and emphasizes the connection between the mind and the body. James believed in free will and the power of the mind to affect events and determine the future. In The Will to Believe (1897) and The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902), he explores metaphysical concepts and mystical experiences. He saw truth not as absolute but as relative, depending on the given situation and the forces at work in it. He believed that the universe was not static and orderly but ever-changing and chaotic. His most important work, Pragmatism (1907), examines the practical consequences of behavior and rejects the idealist philosophy of the transcendentalists. This philosophy seems to reinforce the tenets of social Darwinism and the idea of financial success as the justification of the means in a materialistic society; nevertheless, James strove to demonstrate the practical value of ethical behavior. Overall, James's lifelong concern with what he called the "stream of thought" or "stream of consciousness" changed the way writers conceptualize characters and present the relationship between humans, society, and the natural world. He died due to heart failure on August 26, 1910. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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