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The Negro family in the United States / E. Franklin Frazier.

By: Frazier, Edward Franklin, 1894-1962.
Contributor(s): Glazer, Nathan.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1966Edition: Rev. and abridged ed. Foreword by Nathan Glazer.Description: xxii, 372 p.; 21 cm.Subject(s): African Americans -- Social conditions -- To 1964 | African American families | Families -- United States | Biblioteca "La familia" | African American families | African Americans Social conditions To 1964Additional physical formats: Online version:: Negro family in the United States.DDC classification: 301.45196073 Other classification: 71.37
Contents:
Part one: In the house of the master. 1. Forgotten memories -- 2. Human, all too human -- 3. Motherhood in bondage -- 4. Hagar and her children --- Part two: In the house of the mother. 5. Broken bonds -- 6. Unfettered motherhood -- 7. The matriarchate -- 8. Granny: the guardian of generations --- Part three: The house of the father. 9. The downfall of the matriarchate -- 10. The sons of the free -- 11. Racial islands -- 12. Black puritans --- Part four: In the city of destruction. 13. Roving men and homeless women -- 14. The right from Feudal America -- 15. Fathers on leave -- 16. Outlawed motherhood -- 17. Rebelious youth -- 18. Divorce: scrip from the law --- Part five: In the city of rebirth. 19. Old families and new classes -- 20. The brown middle class -- 21. The Black proletariat --- Conclusion: 22. Retropspect and prospect.
Summary: The Negro Family in the United States, was hailed as a highly important contribution to the intimate history of the people of the United States. It was the first comprehensive study of the family life of African Americans, beginning with colonial-era slavery, extending through the years of slavery and emancipation, to the impact of Jim Crow and migrations to both southern and northern cities in the twentieth century. Frazier discussed all the themes that have concerned subsequent students of the African American family, including matriarchy and patriarchy, the impact of slavery on family solidarity and personal identity, the impact of long-term poverty and lack of access to education, migration and rootlessness, and the relationship between family and community. Frazier insisted that the characteristics of the family were shaped not by race, but by social conditions.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E185.86 .F74 1966 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000409680
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
E185.86 .D845 1978 W.E.B. Du Bois on sociology and the Black community / E185.86 .E68 Blacks and bureaucracy; E185.86 .F72813 1997 Black bourgeoisie / E185.86 .F74 1966 The Negro family in the United States / E185.86 .G54 The Black underclass : E185.86 .G644 1999 Our kind of people : E185.86 .G77 1976 The Black family in slavery and freedom, 1750-1925 /

Revised and abridged edition first published in 1948.

Includes bibliographical footnotes.

Part one: In the house of the master. 1. Forgotten memories -- 2. Human, all too human -- 3. Motherhood in bondage -- 4. Hagar and her children --- Part two: In the house of the mother. 5. Broken bonds -- 6. Unfettered motherhood -- 7. The matriarchate -- 8. Granny: the guardian of generations --- Part three: The house of the father. 9. The downfall of the matriarchate -- 10. The sons of the free -- 11. Racial islands -- 12. Black puritans --- Part four: In the city of destruction. 13. Roving men and homeless women -- 14. The right from Feudal America -- 15. Fathers on leave -- 16. Outlawed motherhood -- 17. Rebelious youth -- 18. Divorce: scrip from the law --- Part five: In the city of rebirth. 19. Old families and new classes -- 20. The brown middle class -- 21. The Black proletariat --- Conclusion: 22. Retropspect and prospect.

The Negro Family in the United States, was hailed as a highly important contribution to the intimate history of the people of the United States. It was the first comprehensive study of the family life of African Americans, beginning with colonial-era slavery, extending through the years of slavery and emancipation, to the impact of Jim Crow and migrations to both southern and northern cities in the twentieth century. Frazier discussed all the themes that have concerned subsequent students of the African American family, including matriarchy and patriarchy, the impact of slavery on family solidarity and personal identity, the impact of long-term poverty and lack of access to education, migration and rootlessness, and the relationship between family and community. Frazier insisted that the characteristics of the family were shaped not by race, but by social conditions.

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