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On account of sex : the politics of women's issues, 1945-1968 / Cynthia Harrison.

By: Harrison, Cynthia Ellen.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, c1988Description: xxii, 337 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0520061217 (alk. paper); 9780520061217 (alk. paper).Report number: 87025550Subject(s): Women's rights -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Women -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Sex discrimination against women -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Feminism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | United States Women's movements, 1945-1970DDC classification: 305.4/2/0973 Other classification: 3,6
Contents:
Preface -- Part One: Consolidation and stalemate, 1945-1960 -- 1. The Equal Rights Amendment and the ambivalent legacy of World War II -- 2. "Reasonable distinctions": an alternative to the ERA -- 3. "Specific bills for specific ills": equal pay legislation -- 4. Tokens of presidential esteem: women appointees -- Part Two: Moving again -- 5. A new frontier for women: the Kennedy administration -- 6. The Equal Pay Act of 1963: compromise and victory -- Part Three: The President's Commission on the Status of Women -- 7. The PCSW versus the ERA -- 8. The PCSW and a unified agenda for women's rights -- Part Four: Beyond the President's Commission -- 9. A model for action -- 10. A new women's movement -- Conclusion: Political strategies and outcomes -- Appendix 1: Text of the Equal Pay Act of 1963 -- Appendix 2: Executive Order 10980 establishing the President's Commission on the Status of Women -- Appendix 3: Members of the President's Commission and its committees.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HQ1236.5.U6 H37 1988 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000410811

Bibliography: p. 309-326.

Includes index.

Preface -- Part One: Consolidation and stalemate, 1945-1960 -- 1. The Equal Rights Amendment and the ambivalent legacy of World War II -- 2. "Reasonable distinctions": an alternative to the ERA -- 3. "Specific bills for specific ills": equal pay legislation -- 4. Tokens of presidential esteem: women appointees -- Part Two: Moving again -- 5. A new frontier for women: the Kennedy administration -- 6. The Equal Pay Act of 1963: compromise and victory -- Part Three: The President's Commission on the Status of Women -- 7. The PCSW versus the ERA -- 8. The PCSW and a unified agenda for women's rights -- Part Four: Beyond the President's Commission -- 9. A model for action -- 10. A new women's movement -- Conclusion: Political strategies and outcomes -- Appendix 1: Text of the Equal Pay Act of 1963 -- Appendix 2: Executive Order 10980 establishing the President's Commission on the Status of Women -- Appendix 3: Members of the President's Commission and its committees.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Everybody knows that the women's movement began in the Sixties, but this well-researched and clearly written book demonstrates that federal policies of the apparently quiescent preceding years gave it something to build on. Harrison gives historical perspective by carefully investigating policymaking, Presidential appointments, and incremental changes affecting women during the Truman, Eisenhower, and Kennedy administrations, and argues that good political strategies can achieve effective policy instruments, regardless of the times. As a case study in effective strategies for political action in the absence of a strong social movement, it provides a realistic lesson. Recommended for public and academic libraries. Mary Drake McFeely, Univ. of Georgia Lib., Athens (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Much has been written about movements for women's rights, especially suffrage, in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Only recently have scholars begun to examine feminists and women's rights activists in the rest of the 20th century. Noteworthy examples are Jo Freeman's The Politics of Women's Liberation (CH, Nov '75); Ethel Klein's Gender Politics (CH, Mar '85), and Nancy F. Cott's The Grounding of Modern Feminism (CH, Feb '88). Harrison's volume is a significant addition to this growing scholarship. These works show that women's rights activists and feminists are not necessarily the same. The Freeman and Harrison books are complementary. Freeman, a political scientist, sees social movements and public policy formation as interrelated, and focuses on effects of the women's movement on public policy in the 1970s. Harrison, a historian, draws on Freeman in her examination of the period from WW II to 1968 to show "how important policy changes can occur, given an appropriate political and social context and savvy political actors, even if no widespread social movement demands them, and that these changes can then encourage the development of such a movement." She treats the strategies of various administrations to achieve equal rights and the contortions of different labor, civil rights, and women's groups. Recommended for all students, faculty, and general readers. -D. L. Fowlkes, Georgia State University

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