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A strategy for peace : human values and the threat of war / Sissela Bok.

By: Bok, Sissela.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Pantheon Books, c1989Edition: 1st ed.Description: xvi, 202 p. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 0394556704; 9780394556703.Subject(s): Peace | Nuclear arms controlDDC classification: 327.1/72 Other classification: 3,6
Contents:
Partisanship and perspective -- Kant on peace -- Clausewitz, war, and strategy -- Toward a strategy for peace -- Objections from a practical point of view.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
JX1952 .B558 1989 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000500694

Includes index.

Partisanship and perspective -- Kant on peace -- Clausewitz, war, and strategy -- Toward a strategy for peace -- Objections from a practical point of view.

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Library Journal Review

In contrast with most peace literature, which deals with peace activities, antiwar movements, the nuclear threat, etc., these books are concerned with crucial human, social, and religious values. In her book, philosopher Bok links shared human values and a framework of existing moral, religious, and political traditions. Peace and strategy, the twin stools supporting Bok's thesis, are explored through an examination of Kant's essay ``Perpetual Peace'' and von Clausewitz's On War , as well as other writers' essays. Bok concludes with advice on implementation and practical uses of peace strategy for all levels of society to cope with varied problems, most importantly the climate of distrust which permeates global affairs. Berryman joins Bok in raising fundamental questions of human values and moral guidelines in his analysis of two pastoral letters on nuclear arms and economic justice issued in the 1980s by U.S. Catholic bishops. George Kennan has referred to these letters as ``the most profound and searching inquiry yet conducted,'' which may make some squirm. While the letters speak for themselves, Berryman clarifies concepts and perceived inconsistencies not clear to the non-Catholic, links common strains from the two letters, and places them within a broader peace/war context. Both Bok and Berryman open new vistas in their vital discussions and deserve our attention.-- Clifton E. Wilson, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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