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An empire for slavery : the peculiar institution in Texas, 1821-1865 / Randolph B. Campbell.

By: Campbell, Randolph B, 1940-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c1989Description: xii, 306 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0807115053 (alk. paper); 9780807115053 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Slavery -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | African Americans -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Texas -- History -- To 1846 | Texas -- History -- 1846-1950 | Texas -- Race relations | Slavery History | TexasDDC classification: 306/.362/09764 Other classification: 15.85 Summary: In the popular mind, Texas conjures up images of the Old West and freedom of the range. Campbell reminds us that Texas grew from Southern roots entangled in human bondage. By the Civil War, Texas had a slave area equal to Alabama and Mississippi and a slave population comparable to Virginia. In the first comprehensive study of slavery in Texas, Campbell offers useful chapters on the law, the domestic slave trade, Indian relations, labor, family, religion, and more, but his book is especially welcome because it pulls the focus on bondage away from the Chesapeake and the Carolinas to show slavery's expansive and adaptive power in the developing West. Slavery knew no bounds, as Lincoln always understood. Recommended for college and university libraries.-- Randall M. Miller, St. Joseph's Univ., Philadelphia.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E445.T47 C35 1989 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000595579

Bibliography: p. 277-293.

Includes index.

In the popular mind, Texas conjures up images of the Old West and freedom of the range. Campbell reminds us that Texas grew from Southern roots entangled in human bondage. By the Civil War, Texas had a slave area equal to Alabama and Mississippi and a slave population comparable to Virginia. In the first comprehensive study of slavery in Texas, Campbell offers useful chapters on the law, the domestic slave trade, Indian relations, labor, family, religion, and more, but his book is especially welcome because it pulls the focus on bondage away from the Chesapeake and the Carolinas to show slavery's expansive and adaptive power in the developing West. Slavery knew no bounds, as Lincoln always understood. Recommended for college and university libraries.-- Randall M. Miller, St. Joseph's Univ., Philadelphia.

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Library Journal Review

In the popular mind, Texas conjures up images of the Old West and freedom of the range. Campbell reminds us that Texas grew from Southern roots entangled in human bondage. By the Civil War, Texas had a slave area equal to Alabama and Mississippi and a slave population comparable to Virginia. In the first comprehensive study of slavery in Texas, Campbell offers useful chapters on the law, the domestic slave trade, Indian relations, labor, family, religion, and more, but his book is especially welcome because it pulls the focus on bondage away from the Chesapeake and the Carolinas to show slavery's expansive and adaptive power in the developing West. Slavery knew no bounds, as Lincoln always understood. Recommended for college and university libraries.-- Randall M. Miller, St. Joseph's Univ., Philadelphia (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Slavery in Texas was not unlike the "peculiar institution" in other Southern states, according to Campbell, author of the first comprehensive study of the subject. The author claims that had Mexico won the 1846-47 war over Texas, "slavery almost certainly would have been abolished." Primarily an economic institution, slavery proved profitable in both the Republic and, later, the state of Texas. Economic success in Texas depended upon black labor, even past "Juneteenth." Most of Campbell's observations are familiar, e.g., treatment by masters, work patterns, and the psychological reaction of the servile population. Free Negroes (fewer than 400) were less important than elsewhere. In terms of specific episodes, the author depends more on the slave narratives of the Works Progress Administration than would some historians. Collected more than six decades after the fact, the memories of exslaves must be a bit suspect. Even so, Campbell provides an excellent index, worthwhile appendixes, and a bibliography that is both impressive and unavailable elsewhere. Upper-division undergraduates and above. -D. E. Everett, Trinity University

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