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The mild reservationists and the League of Nations controversy in the Senate / Herbert F. Margulies.

By: Margulies, Herbert F.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c1989Description: xiv, 300 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 082620693X (alk. paper); 9780826206930 (alk. paper).Subject(s): League of Nations -- United States -- History | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1913-1921 | United States. Congress. Senate -- History | Treaty of Versailles (1919) -- History | League of Nations -- United States | USA -- Senat | Völkerbund | Beitritt | League of Nations Relations with United States, historyAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Mild reservationists and the League of Nations controversy in the Senate.DDC classification: 341.22/73
Contents:
The advent of reservationism, 14 February-10 July 1919 -- Opportunity lost, 10 July-5 September 1919 -- Compromise and confrontation: article ten and the battle on amendments, 4 September-6 November 1919 -- Rejection of the treaty, 22 October-19 November 1919 -- A second try, 20 November 1919 -30 January 1920 -- The last chance, 1 February-19 March 1920 -- Aftermath.
Summary: "During the years 1919-1920, President Woodrow Wilson unsuccessfully struggled to persuade the Senate to ratify the Treaty of Versailles and thereby bring the United States into the newly created League of Nations. In considering the defeat of the treaty in the Senate, historical attention is usually directed toward Wilson and his ardent opposition, Republican Majority Leader Henry Cabot Lodge and the "irreconcilables". Such studies tend to neglect the mild reservationists, ten Republican senators who played a prominent part during this decisive period. Relying on manuscript and newspaper sources, the author argues that, far from being excessively timid and sharing the blame for the League's rejection, as some have contended, the mild reservationists acted effectively to promote approval of the treaty. Failures of judgement by Wilson and the reluctance of Senate Democratic leaders to break with him frustrated their efforts. Margulies aims to provide an analysis of the ratification controversy and hopes to provide fresh insights into this crucial time in America's political past."
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
JX1975.5.U5 M27 1989 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000526582

"During the years 1919-1920, President Woodrow Wilson unsuccessfully struggled to persuade the Senate to ratify the Treaty of Versailles and thereby bring the United States into the newly created League of Nations. In considering the defeat of the treaty in the Senate, historical attention is usually directed toward Wilson and his ardent opposition, Republican Majority Leader Henry Cabot Lodge and the "irreconcilables". Such studies tend to neglect the mild reservationists, ten Republican senators who played a prominent part during this decisive period. Relying on manuscript and newspaper sources, the author argues that, far from being excessively timid and sharing the blame for the League's rejection, as some have contended, the mild reservationists acted effectively to promote approval of the treaty. Failures of judgement by Wilson and the reluctance of Senate Democratic leaders to break with him frustrated their efforts. Margulies aims to provide an analysis of the ratification controversy and hopes to provide fresh insights into this crucial time in America's political past."

Bibliography: p. 279-290.

The advent of reservationism, 14 February-10 July 1919 -- Opportunity lost, 10 July-5 September 1919 -- Compromise and confrontation: article ten and the battle on amendments, 4 September-6 November 1919 -- Rejection of the treaty, 22 October-19 November 1919 -- A second try, 20 November 1919 -30 January 1920 -- The last chance, 1 February-19 March 1920 -- Aftermath.

Includes index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The controversy concerning the degree to which the historical process would have been altered by US adherence to the Treaty of Versailles, thereby permitting the entry of the US into the League of Nations, continues to fascinate students of the interwar period. In most cases, however, the extreme opponents and proponents of the League receive primary attention. With the exception of doctoral dissertations and the occasional biography, the "mild" reservationists are generally ignored. The mild reservationists were ten Republican senators who were not only more moderate than their colleagues, but also exceptional in their willingness to act together at critical points during the approval process. The group consisted of LeBaron B. Colt, Frank B. Kellogg, Knute Nelson, Porter J. McCumber, Charles L. McNary, Irvine L. Lenroot, Walter E. Edge, Frederick Hale, Henry W. Keyes, and Thomas Sterling. They represented primarily states in New England and the Midwest, and differed as to motivation. For some, entry into the League was incidental. Nevertheless, they constitued half the Republican votes needed for approval, and therefore expected to exert considerable influence with respect to the approval of the Treaty of Versailles. Although the mild reservationists were willing to compromise, Wilson was not and the League was doomed. Upper-division undergraduates and above. -J. K. Sweeney, South Dakota State University

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