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Between the enemy and Texas : Parsons's Texas Cavalry in the Civil War / by Anne J. Bailey.

By: Bailey, Anne J.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Fort Worth : Texas Christian University Press, 1989Description: xvi, 357 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0875650341; 9780875650340; 0875653073 (pbk.); 9780875653075 (pbk.).Subject(s): Confederate States of America. Army. Texas Cavalry. Parsons's Brigade -- History | Texas -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Regimental histories | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Regimental histories | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- CampaignsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Between the enemy and Texas.DDC classification: 973.7/464 Summary: Much of the Civil War west of the Mississippi was a war of waiting for action, of foraging already stripped land for an army that supposedly could provision itself, and of disease in camp, while trying to hold out against Union pressure. There were none of the major engagements that characterized the conflict farther east. Instead, small units of Confederate cavalry and infantry skirmished with Federal forces in Arkansas, Missouri, and Louisiana, trying to hold the western Confederacy together. The many units of Texans who joined this fight had a second objective -- to keep the enemy out of their home state by placing themselves "between the enemy and Texas." Historian Anne J. Bailey studies one Texas unit, Parsons's Cavalry Brigade, to show how the war west of the Mississippi was fought. Historian Norman D. Brown calls this "the definitive study of Parsons's Cavalry Brigade; the story will not need to be told again." Exhaustively researched and written with literary grace, Between the Enemy and Texas is a "must" book for anyone interested in the role of mounted troops in the Trans-Mississippi Department.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E580.6.P37 B35 1989 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000551002

Bibliography: p. 325-338.

Much of the Civil War west of the Mississippi was a war of waiting for action, of foraging already stripped land for an army that supposedly could provision itself, and of disease in camp, while trying to hold out against Union pressure. There were none of the major engagements that characterized the conflict farther east. Instead, small units of Confederate cavalry and infantry skirmished with Federal forces in Arkansas, Missouri, and Louisiana, trying to hold the western Confederacy together. The many units of Texans who joined this fight had a second objective -- to keep the enemy out of their home state by placing themselves "between the enemy and Texas." Historian Anne J. Bailey studies one Texas unit, Parsons's Cavalry Brigade, to show how the war west of the Mississippi was fought. Historian Norman D. Brown calls this "the definitive study of Parsons's Cavalry Brigade; the story will not need to be told again." Exhaustively researched and written with literary grace, Between the Enemy and Texas is a "must" book for anyone interested in the role of mounted troops in the Trans-Mississippi Department.

Includes index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Bailey attempts to rectify the frequent neglect of the trans-Mississippi theater in most Civil War narratives, and to relate the story of the common soldier in that war. She concentrates on Colonel William H. Parsons's Texas cavalry brigade, which participated in almost daily skirmishes and occasional battles for three years in Louisiana, Arkansas, and Missouri. Most Civil War memoirs remember the Texas cavalry as a colorful, unruly lot, whose individualistic behavior had prompted one Confederate general to declare that their discipline was "shining by its utter absence." Bailey claims that the Texas troopers were "typical Southerners," who "enjoyed drinking, gambling, singing," and "were expert horsemen and skillful marksmen." If so, this narrative fails to depict the drama of their rebellious actions and to prove that their cultural characteristics made them representative southerners. As for the importance of the military campaigns in the trans-Mississippi theater, even Bailey admits that they "had little bearing on the ultimate outcome." Although the author has used an admirable collection of primary and secondary sources to plot the campaigns of Parsons's brigade, her work is far too narrow to appeal to anyone other than a small group of Civil War buffs. -E. K. Eckert, St. Bonaventure University

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