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Women, the courts, and equality / edited by Laura L. Crites, Winifred L. Hepperle.

Contributor(s): Crites, Laura L | Hepperle, Winifred L.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Sage yearbooks in women's policy studies: v. 11.Publisher: Newbury Park : Sage, c1987Description: 256 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0803928114; 9780803928114; 0803928122 (pbk.); 9780803928121 (pbk.).Subject(s): Women -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United States | Sex discrimination against women -- Law and legislation -- United States | Courts -- United States -- Officials and employees | United States Society Role of women Legal aspectsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Women, the courts, and equality.DDC classification: 342.73/0878/0269 | 347.3028780269 Also issued online.
Contents:
I. Women's rights and the Supreme Court -- Justice, gender, and the justices / Deborah Rhode -- II. Women as victims, litigants, and offenders -- Wife abuse: the Judicial record / Laura L. Crites -- Sexual assault: the second victimization / Cassie C. Spencer -- Judicial perceptions and perceptions of judges: the divorce law revolution in practice / Lenore J. Weitzman -- Female offenders: paternalism reexaminded / Meda Chesney-Lind -- III. Women as judges, lawyers, administrators, and jurors -- Women judges in the opportunity structure / Beverly Blair Cook -- Female court administrators: stuck at mid-level / Winifred L. Hepperle -- Practicing law in a sexist society / Lynn Hecht Schafran -- Women jurors: sexism in jury selection / Anne Rankin Mahoney -- IV. Overcoming gender bias in the courts -- Educating judges about gender bias in the courts / Norma J. Wikler -- V. Conclusion.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
KF390.W6 W65 1987 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000552802

Includes bibliographies.

I. Women's rights and the Supreme Court -- Justice, gender, and the justices / Deborah Rhode -- II. Women as victims, litigants, and offenders -- Wife abuse: the Judicial record / Laura L. Crites -- Sexual assault: the second victimization / Cassie C. Spencer -- Judicial perceptions and perceptions of judges: the divorce law revolution in practice / Lenore J. Weitzman -- Female offenders: paternalism reexaminded / Meda Chesney-Lind -- III. Women as judges, lawyers, administrators, and jurors -- Women judges in the opportunity structure / Beverly Blair Cook -- Female court administrators: stuck at mid-level / Winifred L. Hepperle -- Practicing law in a sexist society / Lynn Hecht Schafran -- Women jurors: sexism in jury selection / Anne Rankin Mahoney -- IV. Overcoming gender bias in the courts -- Educating judges about gender bias in the courts / Norma J. Wikler -- V. Conclusion.

Also issued online.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

An excellent collection of research reports on the latest advances and setbacks for women in the law-as victims, offenders, practitioners, and jurors-and women under the law, especially as interpreted by judges at all levels of courts in the US. While it is apparent that great strides have been made by women entering and graduating from law school and by legislative bodies enacting laws against sex discrimination, it is also obvious that more remains to be accomplished than might have been expected by those working against sex discrimination in the heyday of the 1970s. Especially chilling are the chapters on how judges, not to mention others in the ``justice'' system, still approach cases involving violence against women and divorce. The implication is that such prejudicial judicial behavior, and supposedly gender neutral law in the case of divorce, actually delegitimates many more potential cases that could be brought by women. Especially sobering are the reports that contrast the large numbers of women as law students and graduates to the miniscule numbers of female lawyers who actually become court administrators, practice as trial lawyers, or become judges, especially in the higher state courts and all levels of the federal court system. These chapters reveal the barriers to women's advancement in the law. Those who believe that the problem of sexual inequality is a thing of the past will be brought back to reality. Excellent references.-D.L. Fowlkes, Georgia State University

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