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Texas divided : loyalty and dissent in the lone star state, 1856-1874 / James Marten.

By: Marten, James Alan.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c1990Description: x, 246 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0813117003 (alk. paper) :; 9780813117003 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Texas -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) -- Texas | Texas -- History -- 1846-1950 | Dissenters -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Sectionalism (U.S.) | Dissenters History 19th century Texas | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) Texas | Sectionalism (United States) | Texas History 1846-1950 | Texas History Civil War, 1861-1865Additional physical formats: Online version:: Texas divided.DDC classification: 973.7/09764
Contents:
Drawing the LIne -- Southern Vigilantism and the Sectional Conflict -- Antebellum Dissenters in Texas -- Confederate Unionists and the War -- Unionists as Dissenters -- Speculators, Deserters, and Bandits -- Ethnic Texans and the War -- Loyalty and Reconstruction, 1865-1874 -- Black Texans during Reconstruction.
Subject: Texas, unlike other states of the Confederacy, was virtually untouched by the military campaigns of the Civil War. Moreover, it was home to two considerable ethnic groups Germans and Hispanics who had no traditional ties with the southern way of life. In this book James Marten offers the first general exploration of the shifting relationships among the contending political and ethinic factions in Texas during the sectional crisis of the mid-nineteenth centry.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E532.9 .M37 1990 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000630319

Includes bibliographical references (p. [217]-240).

Texas, unlike other states of the Confederacy, was virtually untouched by the military campaigns of the Civil War. Moreover, it was home to two considerable ethnic groups Germans and Hispanics who had no traditional ties with the southern way of life. In this book James Marten offers the first general exploration of the shifting relationships among the contending political and ethinic factions in Texas during the sectional crisis of the mid-nineteenth centry.

Drawing the LIne -- Southern Vigilantism and the Sectional Conflict -- Antebellum Dissenters in Texas -- Confederate Unionists and the War -- Unionists as Dissenters -- Speculators, Deserters, and Bandits -- Ethnic Texans and the War -- Loyalty and Reconstruction, 1865-1874 -- Black Texans during Reconstruction.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Martin argues convincingly that the isolation of Texas from the centers of armed conflict during the Civil War caused the internal struggle between the supporters and opponents of secession, the Confederacy, and the war to overshadow the conflict between North and South more than it did in any other southern state. Martin traces this struggle from the anti-abolitionist hysteria that swept the state in the late 1850s, through the debates over secession and war, to internal opposition to the war (and efforts to suppress this opposition) and the impact of these internal conflicts on Reconstruction. He avoids the tendency of many students of the Civil War period to lump unionists into one or two general categories. Instead, using manuscript collections, newspapers, and private correspondence, he does an excellent job of detailing the range of both loyalty and dissent as well as the responses to dissent. Especially informative is Martin's discussion of the impact of the war and Reconstruction on ethnic Texans--African Americans, German Americans, and Mexican Americans. Through his focus on the internal conflicts within Civil War Texas, Martin not only increases understanding of Texas history, but also provides insight into the very complex and dynamic nature of loyalty and dissent throughout the Confederacy. All levels. -C. D. Wintz, Texas Southern University

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