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Rhetoric as currency : Hoover, Roosevelt, and the Great Depression / Davis W. Houck.

By: Houck, Davis W.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Presidential rhetoric series: no. 4.Publisher: College Station : Texas A&M University Press, c2001Edition: 1st ed.Description: 226 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 1585441090 (alk. paper); 9781585441099 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Communication in politics -- United States | United States -- Economic conditions -- 1918-1945 | United States -- Economic policy | Depressions -- 1929 -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Rhetoric as currency.DDC classification: 330.973/0916 LOC classification: JA85.2.U6 | H68 2001Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Introduction -- "Talk is Cheap": Herbert Hoover Responds to the Great Depression -- Recontextualizing the Depression War: Christianity, Confidence, and Silence -- "A Satisfactory Embodiment": FDR's "Run" for the Nomination -- Making House Calls: Health, Sickness, and the "Body" Economic -- Rhetoric, Silence, and the "Scene" of War: The Interregnum and the First 100 Days -- Serendip.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
JA85.2.U6 H68 2001 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001516467

Includes bibliographical references (p. 205-219) and index.

1. Introduction -- 2. "Talk is Cheap": Herbert Hoover Responds to the Great Depression -- 3. Recontextualizing the Depression War: Christianity, Confidence, and Silence -- 4. "A Satisfactory Embodiment": FDR's "Run" for the Nomination -- 5. Making House Calls: Health, Sickness, and the "Body" Economic -- 6. Rhetoric, Silence, and the "Scene" of War: The Interregnum and the First 100 Days -- 7. Serendip.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Houck (communication, Florida State) examines the rhetoric of Presidents Herbert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt (from January 1930 through the conclusion of his first hundred days in June 1933) in response to the Great Depression. The scholarship on the Great Depression is voluminous, and historians have raised many of the points presented here. Houck does more than retread worn paths, however. His systematic analysis of public statements of both presidents through overlapping periods of time yields interesting results. Others have commented on the use of the metaphor of war, but Houck shows that Hoover spoke of a decentralized war of the spirit that deflected responsibility from the administration, whereas Roosevelt issued a broad call to arms that was inclusive, centralizing, and unifying. Roosevelt also employed a metaphor of illness and healing, which gained force by virtue of his own personal battle with physical infirmities and helped restore the public confidence necessary for economic recovery. Houck never loses sight of the context of events, and by tracing changes in rhetorical emphasis over time he bolsters the thesis of continuity between the Hoover and Roosevelt administrations. Upper-division undergraduate students and above. A. J. Dunar University of Alabama in Huntsville

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Davis W. Houck, who received his Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University, is an assistant professor of communication at Florida State University.

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