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No band of brothers : problems in the rebel high command / Steven E. Woodworth.

By: Woodworth, Steven E.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Shades of blue and gray series: Publisher: Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c1999Description: xx, 182 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0826212557 (alk. paper); 9780826212559 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Confederate States of America -- Military policy | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Campaigns | Confederate States of America -- Politics and government | Davis, Jefferson, 1808-1889 -- Military leadership | Generals -- Confederate States of America | Confederate States of America. Army -- History | Command of troops -- History -- 19th century | Strategy -- History -- 19th century | Leadership -- History -- 19th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: No band of brothers.; Online version:: No band of brothers.DDC classification: 973.7/3 LOC classification: E487 | .W8 1999
Contents:
Davis, Beauregard, and Washington, D.C., 1861 -- Davis, Polk, and the end of Kentucky neutrality -- Confederate command in microcosm: the case of Williamsburg -- Davis and Lee in the seven days -- "Dismembering the Confederacy": Jefferson Davis and the trans-Mississippi West -- Soldier with a blunted sword: Braxton Bragg and his lieutenants in the Chickamauga campaign -- The president's choices: Confederate command options on the eve of the Atlanta campaign -- Beauregard at Bermuda hundred -- Hood, Davis, and the army of Tennessee: elements of a Confederate debacle -- Homespun generals: nonprofessional officers in the Confederate Army.
Review: "In No Band to Brothers, Steven Woodworth explores, through a series of essays, various facets of the way the Confederacy waged its unsuccessful war for secession. He examines Jefferson Davis and some of his more important generals, including Pierre G. T. Beauregard, Leonidas Polk, Joseph E. Johnston, Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson; the Confederacy's strategic plans; and the South's success in making competent officers out of men with very little military preparation."--BOOK JACKET.Summary: "In analyzing the Confederate leadership, Woodworth reveals some weaknesses, many strengths, and much new information. No Band of Brothers will be welcomed by professional historians, amateur historians, students, and the general reader alike."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E487 .W8 1999 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001517994

Includes bibliographical references (p. 159-176) and index.

Davis, Beauregard, and Washington, D.C., 1861 -- Davis, Polk, and the end of Kentucky neutrality -- Confederate command in microcosm: the case of Williamsburg -- Davis and Lee in the seven days -- "Dismembering the Confederacy": Jefferson Davis and the trans-Mississippi West -- Soldier with a blunted sword: Braxton Bragg and his lieutenants in the Chickamauga campaign -- The president's choices: Confederate command options on the eve of the Atlanta campaign -- Beauregard at Bermuda hundred -- Hood, Davis, and the army of Tennessee: elements of a Confederate debacle -- Homespun generals: nonprofessional officers in the Confederate Army.

"In No Band to Brothers, Steven Woodworth explores, through a series of essays, various facets of the way the Confederacy waged its unsuccessful war for secession. He examines Jefferson Davis and some of his more important generals, including Pierre G. T. Beauregard, Leonidas Polk, Joseph E. Johnston, Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson; the Confederacy's strategic plans; and the South's success in making competent officers out of men with very little military preparation."--BOOK JACKET.

"In analyzing the Confederate leadership, Woodworth reveals some weaknesses, many strengths, and much new information. No Band of Brothers will be welcomed by professional historians, amateur historians, students, and the general reader alike."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

There is little question that Woodworth is rapidly becoming one of the leading scholars of the American Civil War. This collection of ten essays--most previously published--gives the reader an idea of the breadth of his work on the Confederate high command. Most of the essays focus on Confederate President Jefferson Davis's relationship with his field commanders. For example, "Davis and Lee in the Seven Days" is both gracefully written and a model for other scholars to follow. The author concludes that Davis gave General Robert E. Lee "everything the president of the Confederacy could have given except the strategic guidance of a wise commander-in-chief." Another model essay, "The President's Choices: Confederate Command of the Eve of the Atlanta Campaign," points out how Davis missed opportunities to change direction in the South's disastrous western campaign in 1864. These provocative essays, along with the author's other works on Confederate leadership, have forced Civil War scholars to take a fresh look at Jefferson Davis and his commanders. This volume is recommended for anyone interested in the Civil War. All levels. D. L. Wilson; Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Steven E. Woodworth was born on January 28, 1961. He received a B.A. in history from Southern Illinois University in 1982 and a Ph.D. from Rice University in 1987. He is a professor of history at Texas Christian University and an expert on the Civil War. He has written a number of books on the topic including Jefferson Davis and His Generals: The Failure of Confederate Command in the West, While God Is Marching On: The Religious World of Civil War Soldiers, Nothing but Victory: The Army of the Tennessee 1861-1865, Manifest Destinies: Westward Expansion and the Civil War, and This Great Struggle: America's Civil War. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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