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A line in the sand : the Alamo in blood and memory / Randy Roberts, James S. Olson.

By: Roberts, Randy, 1951-.
Contributor(s): Olson, James Stuart, 1946-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Free Press, c2001Description: ix, 356 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., map ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0684835444; 9780684835440.Subject(s): Alamo (San Antonio, Tex.) -- Siege, 1836 | Alamo (San Antonio, Tex.) -- Siege, 1836 -- Influence | Memory -- Social aspects -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Line in the sand.DDC classification: 976.4/03
Contents:
In the footsteps of history -- Free born sons of America -- Bones of warriors -- Those proud tow'rs -- Victory or death -- Interlude -- In search of Davy's grave -- Retrieving the bones of history -- King of the world frontier -- Only heroes, only men -- De la Pena's revenge -- Third battle of the Alamo -- Epilogue -- Notes -- Bibliographic essay -- Index.
Summary: The authors of the bestselling "John Wayne: American" offer a groundbreaking retelling of the most legendary battle in American history and a rich exploration of a great American myth. Of photos. In late February and early March of 1836, the Mexican Army under the command of General Antonio L pez de Santa Anna besieged a small force of Anglo and Tejano rebels at a mission known as the Alamo. The defenders of the Alamo were in an impossible situation. They knew very little of the events taking place outside the mission walls. They did not have much of an understanding of Santa Anna or of his government in Mexico City. They sent out contradictory messages, they received contradictory communications, they moved blindly and planned in the dark. And in the dark early morning of March 6, they died. In that brief, confusing, and deadly encounter, one of America's most potent symbols was born. The story of the last stand at the Alamo grew from a Texas rallying cry, to a national slogan, to a phenomenon of popular culture and presidential politics. Yet it has been a hotly contested symbol from the first. Questions remain about what really happened: Did William Travis really draw a line in the sand? Did Davy Crockett die fighting, surrounded by the bodies of two dozen of the enemy? And what of the participants' motives and purposes? Were the Texans justified in their rebellion? Were they sincere patriots making a last stand for freedom and liberty, or were they a ragtag collection of greedy men-on-the-make, washed-up politicians, and backwoods bullies, Americans bent on extending American slavery into a foreign land? The full story of the Alamo -- from the weeks and months that led up to the fateful encounter to the movies and speeches that continue to remember it today -- is a quintessential story of America's past and a fascinating window into our collective memory. In A Line in the Sand, acclaimed historians Randy Roberts and James Olson use a wealth of archival sources, including the diary of Jos Enrique de la Pe a, along with important and little-used Mexican documents, to retell the story of the Alamo for a new generation of Americans. They explain what happened from the perspective of all parties, not just Anglo and Mexican soldiers, but also Tejano allies and bystanders. They delve anew into the mysteries of Crockett's final hours and Travis's famous rhetoric. Finally, they show how preservationists, television and movie producers, historians, and politicians have become the Alamo's major interpreters. Walt Disney, John Wayne, and scores of journalists and cultural critics have used the Alamo to contest the very meaning of America, and thereby helped us all to "remember the Alamo."
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F390 .R67 2001 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001518018

Includes bibliographical references and index.

In the footsteps of history -- Free born sons of America -- Bones of warriors -- Those proud tow'rs -- Victory or death -- Interlude -- In search of Davy's grave -- Retrieving the bones of history -- King of the world frontier -- Only heroes, only men -- De la Pena's revenge -- Third battle of the Alamo -- Epilogue -- Notes -- Bibliographic essay -- Index.

The authors of the bestselling "John Wayne: American" offer a groundbreaking retelling of the most legendary battle in American history and a rich exploration of a great American myth. Of photos. In late February and early March of 1836, the Mexican Army under the command of General Antonio L pez de Santa Anna besieged a small force of Anglo and Tejano rebels at a mission known as the Alamo. The defenders of the Alamo were in an impossible situation. They knew very little of the events taking place outside the mission walls. They did not have much of an understanding of Santa Anna or of his government in Mexico City. They sent out contradictory messages, they received contradictory communications, they moved blindly and planned in the dark. And in the dark early morning of March 6, they died. In that brief, confusing, and deadly encounter, one of America's most potent symbols was born. The story of the last stand at the Alamo grew from a Texas rallying cry, to a national slogan, to a phenomenon of popular culture and presidential politics. Yet it has been a hotly contested symbol from the first. Questions remain about what really happened: Did William Travis really draw a line in the sand? Did Davy Crockett die fighting, surrounded by the bodies of two dozen of the enemy? And what of the participants' motives and purposes? Were the Texans justified in their rebellion? Were they sincere patriots making a last stand for freedom and liberty, or were they a ragtag collection of greedy men-on-the-make, washed-up politicians, and backwoods bullies, Americans bent on extending American slavery into a foreign land? The full story of the Alamo -- from the weeks and months that led up to the fateful encounter to the movies and speeches that continue to remember it today -- is a quintessential story of America's past and a fascinating window into our collective memory. In A Line in the Sand, acclaimed historians Randy Roberts and James Olson use a wealth of archival sources, including the diary of Jos Enrique de la Pe a, along with important and little-used Mexican documents, to retell the story of the Alamo for a new generation of Americans. They explain what happened from the perspective of all parties, not just Anglo and Mexican soldiers, but also Tejano allies and bystanders. They delve anew into the mysteries of Crockett's final hours and Travis's famous rhetoric. Finally, they show how preservationists, television and movie producers, historians, and politicians have become the Alamo's major interpreters. Walt Disney, John Wayne, and scores of journalists and cultural critics have used the Alamo to contest the very meaning of America, and thereby helped us all to "remember the Alamo."

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In this work, Roberts and Olson (coauthors of John Wayne: American) attempt to take an event that has become ingrained in the American memory and fully examine it. The book is divided into two sections. The first part looks at events leading up to the Alamo, offering in-depth information on such major figures as Santa Anna, Davey Crockett, William Travis, and others. The latter part of the book revolves around the Alamo in the minds of Americans. It looks at the battle that ensued to make the Alamo a national monument and the myths surrounding both events and people that have been perpetuated in literature, motion pictures, and politics. The authors have consulted many valuable sources, producing a detailed work that will appeal especially to those interested in the history of the Alamo and its meaning for Americans. Not the final word on the subject, this is nevertheless recommended for libraries with Southwest and Texas history collections.DTerri Summey, Emporia State Univ. Lib., KS (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Randy Roberts is professor of history at Purdue University and lives in Lafayette, Indiana <br> James S. Olson is distinguished professor of history at Sam Houston State University and lives in Huntsville, Texas

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