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The year of Miss Agnes / Kirkpatrick Hill.

By: Hill, Kirkpatrick.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Margaret K. McElderry Books, c2000Edition: 1st ed.Description: 115 p. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 0689829337; 9780689829338.Subject(s): Schools -- Juvenile fiction | Teachers -- Juvenile fiction | Athapascan Indians -- Juvenile fiction | Indians of North America -- Alaska -- Juvenile fiction | Alaska -- Juvenile fictionDDC classification: [Fic] LOC classification: PZ7.H55285 | Ye 2000Summary: Ten-year-old Fred (short for Frederika) narrates the story of school and village life among the Athapascans in Alaska during 1948 when Miss Agnes arrived as the new teacher.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Juvenile Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Juvenile Fiction Area
H6466YE (Browse shelf) Available 0000001524321

Ten-year-old Fred (short for Frederika) narrates the story of school and village life among the Athapascans in Alaska during 1948 when Miss Agnes arrived as the new teacher.

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School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-5-Teaching the children in an Athabascan village in a one-room schoolhouse on the Alaskan frontier in 1948 is not every educator's dream. Then one day, tall, skinny Agnes Sutterfield arrives and life is never the same for the community. Frederika (Fred), the 10-year-old narrator, discovers that unlike previous teachers, Miss Agnes doesn't mind the smell of fish that the children bring for lunch each day. She also stokes the fire to warm the schoolhouse before the students' arrival each morning, wears pants, and speaks with a strange accent. Miss Agnes immediately packs away the old textbooks, hangs up the children's brightly colored artwork, plays opera music, and reads them Robin Hood and Greek myths. She teaches them about their land and their culture, tutors both students and parents in her cabin in the evening, and even learns sign language along with her students so that Fred's deaf sister can attend school. Hill has created more than just an appealing cast of characters; she introduces readers to a whole community and makes a long-ago and faraway place seem real and very much alive. This is an inspirational story about Alaska, the old and new ways, a very special teacher, and the influence that she has over everyone she meets. A wonderful read-aloud to start off the school year.-Kit Vaughan, Midlothian Middle School, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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