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Still fighting the Civil War : the American South and southern history / David Goldfield.

By: Goldfield, David R, 1944-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c2002Description: xiii, 354 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0807127582 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780807127582 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Southern States -- Civilization | Southern States -- Social conditions | Southern States -- History -- Philosophy | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- InfluenceDDC classification: 975/.041 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Introduction -- The past is -- God-haunted -- Culture protestants -- Pretty women -- Lady insurrectionists -- A woman's movement -- Colors -- Sharings -- New battlegrounds, old strategies -- Measures -- Histories.
Review: "Newcomers to the South often remark that southerners, at least white southerners, are still fighting the Civil War - a strange preoccupation considering that the war formally ended more than 135 years ago and fewer than a third of southerners today can claim an ancestor who actually fought in the conflict. But even if the war is far removed both in time and genealogy, it survives in the hearts of many of the region's residents and often in national newspaper headlines concerning battle flags, racial justice, and religious conflicts. In this sweeping narrative of the South from the Civil War to the present, noted historian David Goldfield contemplates the roots of southern memory and explains how this memory has shaped the modern South both for good and ill.".Summary: "He discusses how and why white southern men fashioned the myths of the Lost Cause and the Redemption out of the Civil War and Reconstruction. They shaped a religion to canonize the heroes and reify the events of those fated years. History became both fact and faith. The men mobilized these myths to secure their domination over African Americans and white women, as well as over the South's political and economic systems. Goldfield also recounts how blacks and white women eventually crafted a different, more inclusive version of southern history and how that new vision has competed with more traditional perspectives.".Summary: "As Goldfield shows, the battle for southern history, and for the South, continues - in museums, public spaces, books, state legislatures, and the minds of southerners. Given the region's population boom, growing economic power, and political influence, the outcome of this war is more than a historian's preoccupation; it is of national importance. Integrating history and memory, religion, race, and gender, Still Fighting the Civil War will help newcomers, longtime residents, and curious outsiders alike attain a better understanding of the South and each other."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F209 .G65 2002 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001532167

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- The past is -- God-haunted -- Culture protestants -- Pretty women -- Lady insurrectionists -- A woman's movement -- Colors -- Sharings -- New battlegrounds, old strategies -- Measures -- Histories.

"Newcomers to the South often remark that southerners, at least white southerners, are still fighting the Civil War - a strange preoccupation considering that the war formally ended more than 135 years ago and fewer than a third of southerners today can claim an ancestor who actually fought in the conflict. But even if the war is far removed both in time and genealogy, it survives in the hearts of many of the region's residents and often in national newspaper headlines concerning battle flags, racial justice, and religious conflicts. In this sweeping narrative of the South from the Civil War to the present, noted historian David Goldfield contemplates the roots of southern memory and explains how this memory has shaped the modern South both for good and ill.".

"He discusses how and why white southern men fashioned the myths of the Lost Cause and the Redemption out of the Civil War and Reconstruction. They shaped a religion to canonize the heroes and reify the events of those fated years. History became both fact and faith. The men mobilized these myths to secure their domination over African Americans and white women, as well as over the South's political and economic systems. Goldfield also recounts how blacks and white women eventually crafted a different, more inclusive version of southern history and how that new vision has competed with more traditional perspectives.".

"As Goldfield shows, the battle for southern history, and for the South, continues - in museums, public spaces, books, state legislatures, and the minds of southerners. Given the region's population boom, growing economic power, and political influence, the outcome of this war is more than a historian's preoccupation; it is of national importance. Integrating history and memory, religion, race, and gender, Still Fighting the Civil War will help newcomers, longtime residents, and curious outsiders alike attain a better understanding of the South and each other."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Goldfield (history, Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte) focuses on how race, religion, and Civil War history have shaped Southern culture. He discusses how Southern white men turned the Civil War and the Reconstruction era into the "Lost Cause" and "Redemption" in an effort to restore the principles on which Southern society rested, namely, white supremacy and patriarchy. The first part of the book focuses on the white male establishment's efforts to maintain the status quo. Goldfield then describes how white and African American women and, finally, African American men slowly but steadily worked toward equality. The author argues that, despite a great deal of progress, the South continues to be burdened by its past, citing the recent South Carolina flag controversy as an example. Goldfield's narrative consists of short historical vignettes drawn from history, journals, diaries, and novels interspersed with his own musings and opinions, making it more a compilation of interesting stories and reflections than a social history of the period. Recommended only for academic libraries with comprehensive Southern history collections. Robert K. Flatley, Frostburg State Univ., MD (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Still Fighting represents a significant contribution to the study of the origins of the "lost cause" myth that was created after the Civil War to justify the sacrifices made in the defense of the Confederacy, and that permeated all Southern institutions. Goldfield (Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte) asserts that Southern white men, in order to compensate for their defeat, built the "New South" on a myth grounded in patriarchy and racism. Despite efforts made by progressive whites and African Americans, the myth withstood all challenges. Dissenters often questioned the prevailing view of Southern history prior to the Civil War as a land of cavaliers and their ladies at their peril. The recent flap over the Confederate flag, Goldfield points out, demonstrates the saliency of the debate. He also declares that some progress has been made in creating a more diverse and inclusive Southern history. However, he will "not hold his breath" in anticipation of a totally balanced Southern history. Despite only 30 percent of Southerners being able to trace an ancestor to Confederate service, many have adopted the symbols of the "lost cause" as their own. A superb work for all levels and collections. D. R. Turner Davis and Elkins College

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