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Indians, settlers & slaves in a frontier exchange economy : the Lower Mississippi Valley before 1783 / by Daniel H. Usner, Jr.

By: Usner, Daniel H.
Contributor(s): Institute of Early American History and Culture (Williamsburg, Va.).
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chapel Hill : Published for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, by the University of North Carolina Press, c1992Description: xvii, 294 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0807820148 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780807820148 (cloth : alk. paper); 080784358X (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780807843581 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Mississippi River Valley -- History -- 18th century | Mississippi River Valley -- Commerce -- History -- 18th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Indians, settlers & slaves in a frontier exchange economy.DDC classification: 977 Other classification: 15.85 | 6,33 | 71.37 | 73.45
Contents:
Pt. I. The Evolution of a Colonial Region, 1699-1783. 1. Trade and Settlement in the Formation of a Colonial Region. 2. Divergence within Colonial and Indian Societies. 3. The Indian Alliance Network of a Marginal European Colony. 4. Change and Continuity during the Years of Partition -- Pt. II. The Frontier Exchange Economy. 5. Farming, Hunting, and Herding. 6. Food Marketing and the Evolution of Regional Foodways. 7. Soldiers, Sailors, and Rowers. 8. The Deerskin Trade as a Market System.
Awards: American Historical Association John H. Dunning Prize for U.S. history, 1993.Summary: In this pioneering book Daniel Usner examines the economic and cultural interactions among the Indians, Europeans, and African slaves of colonial Louisiana, including the province of West Florida. Rather than focusing on a single cultural group or on a particular economic activity, this study traces the complex social linkages among Indian villages, colonial plantations, hunting camps, military outposts, and port towns across a large region of the pre-cotton south. Usner.Summary: begins by providing a chronological overview of events in the area from the establishment of a French outpost on the Gulf coast in 1699 to Spanish acquisition of West Florida after the Revolution. He then shows how early confrontations and transactions shaped the formation of Louisiana into a distinct colonial region with a social system based on mutual needs of subsistence. In this area, as in other early colonial regions of North America, Indians, settlers, and slaves.Summary: interacted with each other and contributed to the regional economy in diverse and fluid ways. After the Lower Mississippi Valley was partitioned between Great Britain and Spain in 1762-1763, argues Usner, the local exchange economy faced new pressures as a result of increased settlement and intensification of export-oriented agriculture along the lower Mississippi River. The flexibility that had characterized cultural and economic interaction began to give way to more.Summary: rigid boundaries between ethnic groups. Usner's focus on commerce allows him to illuminate the motives in the contest for empire among the French, English, and Spanish, as well as to trace the personal networks of communication and exchange that existed among the territory's inhabitants. By tracing patterns of small-scale, face-to-face exchange, he reveals the economic and social world of early Louisianians and lays the groundwork for a better understanding of later.Summary: southern society.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F352 .U86 1992 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001176098

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Pt. I. The Evolution of a Colonial Region, 1699-1783. 1. Trade and Settlement in the Formation of a Colonial Region. 2. Divergence within Colonial and Indian Societies. 3. The Indian Alliance Network of a Marginal European Colony. 4. Change and Continuity during the Years of Partition -- Pt. II. The Frontier Exchange Economy. 5. Farming, Hunting, and Herding. 6. Food Marketing and the Evolution of Regional Foodways. 7. Soldiers, Sailors, and Rowers. 8. The Deerskin Trade as a Market System.

In this pioneering book Daniel Usner examines the economic and cultural interactions among the Indians, Europeans, and African slaves of colonial Louisiana, including the province of West Florida. Rather than focusing on a single cultural group or on a particular economic activity, this study traces the complex social linkages among Indian villages, colonial plantations, hunting camps, military outposts, and port towns across a large region of the pre-cotton south. Usner.

begins by providing a chronological overview of events in the area from the establishment of a French outpost on the Gulf coast in 1699 to Spanish acquisition of West Florida after the Revolution. He then shows how early confrontations and transactions shaped the formation of Louisiana into a distinct colonial region with a social system based on mutual needs of subsistence. In this area, as in other early colonial regions of North America, Indians, settlers, and slaves.

interacted with each other and contributed to the regional economy in diverse and fluid ways. After the Lower Mississippi Valley was partitioned between Great Britain and Spain in 1762-1763, argues Usner, the local exchange economy faced new pressures as a result of increased settlement and intensification of export-oriented agriculture along the lower Mississippi River. The flexibility that had characterized cultural and economic interaction began to give way to more.

rigid boundaries between ethnic groups. Usner's focus on commerce allows him to illuminate the motives in the contest for empire among the French, English, and Spanish, as well as to trace the personal networks of communication and exchange that existed among the territory's inhabitants. By tracing patterns of small-scale, face-to-face exchange, he reveals the economic and social world of early Louisianians and lays the groundwork for a better understanding of later.

southern society.

American Historical Association John H. Dunning Prize for U.S. history, 1993.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Innovative on two counts, this book succeeds both as a narrative that integrates Indians, blacks, and European settlers into a history of Louisiana from French settlement in 1699 until its cession to the Spanish in 1783, and as a detailed examination of the exchange networks that provided subsistence to the peoples of the area and characterized the cultural interchanges among them. Usner (history, Cornell) focuses on food production, transport, and marketing as a way of examining the social relations among Indians, blacks, and French colonists, resulting in new perspectives on slavery, Indian-white relations, and colonial life. He shows how the development of plantation agriculture destroyed the frontier exchange economy, without entirely dismantling the unique society it had created.-- David B. Mattern, Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Winner of the Jamestown Manuscript Prize in 1990, Usner's economic and cultural study of Colonial Louisiana is a pioneering work in reconstructing the relationships among Indians, European settlers, and their slaves. Usner traces the trading and diplomatic alliances forged by the French with Indians in the lower South, alliances which were based on mutual needs for subsistence. He shows that the roles in commerce of both Indians and slaves were much more versatile than was the case by the end of the 18th century. Usner begins his narrative with a historical overview of events in the lower Louisiana territory between 1699 and 1783. He next discusses activities found on the 18th-century frontier: farming, hunting, and herding; food marketing; the military occupations of soldiers, sailors, and rowers; and the deerskin trade as a market system. Usner's careful scholarship and his rich variety of sources put together an incredibly vivid picture of Colonial life in the lower Mississippi Valley. This book is a must for scholars of the lower South. Detailed footnotes, maps. All levels. J. Jackson; Southeastern Louisiana University

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