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Good wives, nasty wenches, and anxious patriarchs : gender, race, and power in colonial Virginia / Kathleen M. Brown.

By: Brown, Kathleen M, 1960-.
Contributor(s): Institute of Early American History and Culture (Williamsburg, Va.).
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chapel Hill : Published for the Institute of Early American History and Culture by the University of North Carolina Press, 1996Description: xvi, 496 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0807823074 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780807823071 (cloth : alk. paper); 0807846236 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780807846230 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Virginia -- History -- Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775 | Sex role -- Virginia -- History | Women -- Virginia -- Social conditions | Virginia -- Race relations | Social classes -- Virginia -- HistoryDDC classification: 975.5/02 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Gender and English identity on the eve of colonial settlement -- The Anglo-Indian gender frontier -- "Good wives" and "nasty wenches": gender and the social order in a colonial settlement -- Engendering racial difference, 1640-1670 -- Vile rogues and honorable men: Nathaniel Bacon and the dilemma of colonial masculinity -- From "foul crimes" to "spurious issue": sexual regulation and the social construction of race -- "Born of a free woman": gender and the politics of freedom -- Marriage, class formation, and the performance of male gentility -- Tea table discourses and slanderous tongues: the domestic choreography of female identities -- Anxious patriarchs.
Awards: American Historical Association John H. Dunning Prize for U.S. history, 1997.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F229 .B8783 1996 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001176114

Gender and English identity on the eve of colonial settlement -- The Anglo-Indian gender frontier -- "Good wives" and "nasty wenches": gender and the social order in a colonial settlement -- Engendering racial difference, 1640-1670 -- Vile rogues and honorable men: Nathaniel Bacon and the dilemma of colonial masculinity -- From "foul crimes" to "spurious issue": sexual regulation and the social construction of race -- "Born of a free woman": gender and the politics of freedom -- Marriage, class formation, and the performance of male gentility -- Tea table discourses and slanderous tongues: the domestic choreography of female identities -- Anxious patriarchs.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

American Historical Association John H. Dunning Prize for U.S. history, 1997.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

"A negroe and a passionate woman are equal as to truth or falsehood; for neither thinks of what they say," wrote Landon Carter in 1777. To explain Carter's words Brown patiently follows gender and race in Colonial Virginia. She argues that early English colonists brought imprecise ideas about race, but clear ideas about gender differences and roles. The latter were instrumental in constructing the system of racial differences, even as they were themselves racialized. The pejorative "wench," once a lower-class English woman, gradually became in Virginia a woman of African descent, a change indicative both of black women's status and of 18th-century elite women's aspirations. The categories woman and slave helped define the Virginian gentleman revolutionary by what he was not, however much the process was (is) disguised or unrecognized. Brown's notes are too rich to have been relegated to end references. If William Byrd appears there disconcertingly often, domestic architecture is used as evidence with appropriate seriousness and imagination. The book should be a standard purchase for all academic libraries with holdings in US history. Upper-division undergraduates and above. A. Graebner; College of St. Catherine

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