Notorious identity : materializing the subject in Shakespeare / Linda Charnes.

By: Charnes, LindaMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1995, c1993Edition: 1st Harvard University Press paperback edDescription: ix, 213 p. ; 23 cmISBN: 0674627814 (pbk.); 9780674627819 (pbk.)Subject(s): Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Knowledge -- History | Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Antony and Cleopatra | Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Troilus and Cressida | Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. King Richard III | Historical drama, English -- History and criticism | Identity (Psychology) in literature | Legends in literature | Fame in literatureDDC classification: 828 | 822.3/3 LOC classification: PR3014 | .C43 1995
Contents:
Belaboring the obvious : reading the monstrous body in King Richard III -- "So unsecret to ourselves" : notorious identity and the material subject in Troilus and Cressida -- Spies and whispers : exceeding reputation in Antony and Cleopatra.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PR3014 .C43 1995 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001560341

Includes bibliographical references (p. 161-206) and index.

Belaboring the obvious : reading the monstrous body in King Richard III -- "So unsecret to ourselves" : notorious identity and the material subject in Troilus and Cressida -- Spies and whispers : exceeding reputation in Antony and Cleopatra.

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CHOICE Review

Now that the first wave of theoretically oriented readings of Shakespeare has passed, advocates for a more traditional approach are making themselves heard--e.g., Brian Vickers's Appropriating Shakespeare (CH, Nov'93). To be sure, the New Historicist readers of Shakespeare were not without their faults, whether by employing the rhetoric of deconstruction without its philosophical content or by producing new historical knowledge without a critical apparatus through which to relate it to the literary work. But these excesses were much less significant than the massive sea-change that deconstruction and New Historicism wrought on the institution that is Shakespeare. While many critics are now stepping back from the responsibilities to which theory has brought the reading of Shakespeare, Charnes insists, with great panache, that the historical and theoretical reading of Shakespeare remains an imperative project that must be related to issues raised by the study of popular culture. Arguing that Richard III, Troilus and Cressida, and Antony and Cleopatra form a sub-genre within the Shakespeare canon because they concern well-known figures of legendary repute, Charnes reveals how each of these plays reflects on its dynamic relation to the historical intertext. Drawing on the work of Leo Braudy, Slavoj Zizek, and Pierre Bourdieu, Charnes creates a lively theoretical idiom and offers some important insights. Advanced undergraduate; graduate; faculty. N. Lukacher; University of Illinois at Chicago

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