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Japan's war : the great Pacific conflict, 1853 to 1952 / by Edwin P. Hoyt.

By: Hoyt, Edwin Palmer.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : McGraw-Hill, c1986Description: xii, 514 p., [30] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0070306125; 9780070306127.Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Campaigns -- Pacific Area | World War, 1939-1945 -- Japan | Japan -- History, Military -- 1868- | Japan -- Politics and government -- 1868- | Pacific Area -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Japan's war.DDC classification: 940.54/26 Summary: This account of the Pacific arena in World War II brings fresh insight to the crucial questions: Why did Japan start the war in the Pacific? Why was the U.S. unprepared to meet the challenge? Tracing the history of Japanese aggression from 1853, the author sheds new light on the "China Question," the rape of Hong Kong, the Bataan Death March, and the murder camps of the East Indies. He analyzed Japan's policy of hakko ichiu--all eight corners of the world under one roof--that precipitated their military build-up. Japan's historical rivalry with the U.S.--more recognized there than here--made conflict, if not inevitable, at least probable.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D767 .H653 1986 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100024447

One map on lining papers.

Bibliography: p. [489]-495.

Includes index.

This account of the Pacific arena in World War II brings fresh insight to the crucial questions: Why did Japan start the war in the Pacific? Why was the U.S. unprepared to meet the challenge? Tracing the history of Japanese aggression from 1853, the author sheds new light on the "China Question," the rape of Hong Kong, the Bataan Death March, and the murder camps of the East Indies. He analyzed Japan's policy of hakko ichiu--all eight corners of the world under one roof--that precipitated their military build-up. Japan's historical rivalry with the U.S.--more recognized there than here--made conflict, if not inevitable, at least probable.

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Library Journal Review

"Using the official 101-volume Japanese-language history of World War II, which has never before been mined by Western historians, Hoyt has compiled a brilliantly accurate history of the war from the Japanese standpoint" was how LJ's reviewer praised this 1986 volume. Juxtaposing the histories of both Japan and the United States from 1853 to the 1950s, Hoyt concludes that the Pacific war was an inevitable clash. "Huge in scope, superbly researched, and eminently readable, this is essential for World War II collections." (LJ 3/15/86) (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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