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Black potatoes : the story of the great Irish famine, 1845-1850 / Susan Campbell Bartoletti.

By: Bartoletti, Susan Campbell.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 2001Description: 184 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0618002715 (RNF); 9780618002719; 0618548831 (PAP); 9780618548835 (PAP); 9780756950811 (PFNL); 0756950813 (PFNL).Subject(s): Ireland -- History -- Famine, 1845-1852 -- Juvenile literatureDDC classification: 941.5081
Contents:
1. Black potatoes, black potatoes -- 2. We've an extra potato -- 3. Lend me a little Reliefe -- 4. A flock of famishing crows -- 5. Only till the praties grow -- 6. The fever, the God bless us and protect everyone -- 7. A terrible leveling of houses -- 8. The going away -- 9. Where would the war begin? -- 10. Come to cork to see the queen.
Awards: Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal, 2002.Summary: The story of the Great Irish Famine, through the eyes and memories of the Irish people. Tells how they lived, why their lives depended on the potato, how they dreaded the workhouse, and how they feared and defied the landlord who collected the rent and evicted them.
List(s) this item appears in: Ireland 1845
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
941 B2925BL (Browse shelf) Available 0000001618115

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Black potatoes, black potatoes -- 2. We've an extra potato -- 3. Lend me a little Reliefe -- 4. A flock of famishing crows -- 5. Only till the praties grow -- 6. The fever, the God bless us and protect everyone -- 7. A terrible leveling of houses -- 8. The going away -- 9. Where would the war begin? -- 10. Come to cork to see the queen.

The story of the Great Irish Famine, through the eyes and memories of the Irish people. Tells how they lived, why their lives depended on the potato, how they dreaded the workhouse, and how they feared and defied the landlord who collected the rent and evicted them.

Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal, 2002.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 6 Up-In the 1800s, potatoes were the staple food and source of income for the Irish. When blight struck the crop in 1845, they faced not only economic deprivation, but also starvation. Laborers sold their possessions for a few meals. Families unable to obtain enough food for their families had to choose who would eat, who would enter the workhouse, and who had to scrape by as best they could. Relief efforts by the English were meager and insufficient, particularly as the famine continued in Ireland for five years. More than one million people died in a five year span. Another two million emigrated to America, Canada, Australia, and other countries, extending the economic and political impact of the Irish potato famine. Bartoletti discusses both the political climate and historical events in her book (Houghton Mifflin, 2001), and intertwines them with personal accounts of individuals who lived through this time period. Traditional poetry and prose are woven throughout this volume, brought to life by narrator Graeme Malcolm, whose Irish lilt adds authenticity to the recording. A fine addition to middle and high school libraries.-Amanda Rollins, Northwest Village School, Plainville, CT (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

A former 8th-grade English teacher, Susan Campbell Bartoletti writes fiction and nonfiction for all ages. Black Potatoes is the winner of the ALA Sibert Award for Best Information book, the NCTE Orbis Pictus Award for Distinguished Nonfiction, and the SCBWI Golden Kite Nonfiction award. She lives with her family in Moscow, PA.

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