English women's poetry, 1649-1714 : politics, community, and linguistic authority / Carol Barash.

By: Barash, CarolMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: Oxford : New York : Clarendon Press ; Oxford University Press, 1996Description: xii, 345 p. : ill. ; 25 cmISBN: 0198119739 (acid-free paper); 9780198119739 (acid-free paper); 019818686X; 9780198186861Subject(s): English poetry -- Early modern, 1500-1700 -- History and criticism | Women and literature -- Great Britain -- History -- 17th century | Women and literature -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century | English poetry -- Women authors -- History and criticism | English poetry -- 18th century -- History and criticism | Politics and literature -- Great Britain -- History | Feminism and literature -- Great Britain -- History | Language and culture -- Great Britain -- History | Feminist poetry, English -- History and criticism | Authority in literature | Sex role in literature | Queens in literatureDDC classification: 821.0099287 LOC classification: PR545.W6 | B37 1996Other classification: 18.05
Contents:
English and continental origins: queens, heroes, prophets -- Gender, prophecy, and women's place in the Restoration -- The heroic woman -- Gender and the Restoration stage -- The marriage of king and people -- The performance of gender at the late Stuart court -- The female war -- Women's community and the exiled king: Katherine Philips's society of friendship -- Royalism and the heroic woman -- The self-fashioning of the Restoration woman writer -- Narratives of love and warfare in Philips's 1650s manuscript -- Courting political favour -- The publication of poems (1664) -- Marriage, friendship, and honour
Eros, myth, and monarchy in Aphra Behn -- Gender, myth, and translation -- Gender, authority, and the female sexual subject -- Desire and the uncoupling of myth in Behn's erotic poems -- The woman poet and the female monarch -- The female monarch and the woman poet: Mary of Modena, Anne Killigrew, and Jane Barker -- The imaginary underworld of Mary of Modena's court -- The woman painter and the female hero -- Anne Killigrew as linguistic and political subject at court -- Jane Barker's genres and the late Stuart court -- Poetical recreations -- Barker's landscape of the female body -- Female linguistic authority and the coronation of Orinda
Commands from underground: Barker's manuscript poems -- Queen Anne among the poets -- The glorious revolution as bourgeois marriage -- Queen Anne's two bodies -- Anne's dutiful daughters -- The limits of feminist imperialism -- Anne Finch: gender, politics, and myths of the private self -- Anne Finch and the Catholic Stuarts -- The publicly private Finch and miscellany poems -- Female community and female authority -- Finch's female poetic genealogy.
Summary: This is the first study to reconstruct the political origins of English women's poetry between the execution of Charles I and the death of Queen Anne. Carol Barash's book shows that, between Katherine Philips (1632-64) and Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea (1661-1720), an English women's poetic tradition developed as a part of the larger political shifts in these years, and particularly in women writers' fascination with the figure of the female monarch. Writers discussed include Aphra Behn, Katherine Philips, Anne Killigrew, Jane Barker, and Anne Finch. Based on extensive archival research in England and the United States, English Women's Poetry, 1649-1714 argues that ideas about women's voices and women's communities were crucial to the shaping of an English national literature after the civil wars. Women enter print culture - as poets and as women - by situating their writing in defence of embattled monarchy. Women poets are especially fascinated with the figure of the female monarch (both real and mythic). Their sense of poetic legitimacy derives from the communities they generate around figures of female authority, particularly James II's second wife, Mary of Modena, and later Queen Anne.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PR545.W6 B37 1996 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001620806

Includes bibliographical references (p. [314]-335) and index.

This is the first study to reconstruct the political origins of English women's poetry between the execution of Charles I and the death of Queen Anne. Carol Barash's book shows that, between Katherine Philips (1632-64) and Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea (1661-1720), an English women's poetic tradition developed as a part of the larger political shifts in these years, and particularly in women writers' fascination with the figure of the female monarch. Writers discussed include Aphra Behn, Katherine Philips, Anne Killigrew, Jane Barker, and Anne Finch. Based on extensive archival research in England and the United States, English Women's Poetry, 1649-1714 argues that ideas about women's voices and women's communities were crucial to the shaping of an English national literature after the civil wars. Women enter print culture - as poets and as women - by situating their writing in defence of embattled monarchy. Women poets are especially fascinated with the figure of the female monarch (both real and mythic). Their sense of poetic legitimacy derives from the communities they generate around figures of female authority, particularly James II's second wife, Mary of Modena, and later Queen Anne.

English and continental origins: queens, heroes, prophets -- Gender, prophecy, and women's place in the Restoration -- The heroic woman -- Gender and the Restoration stage -- The marriage of king and people -- The performance of gender at the late Stuart court -- The female war -- Women's community and the exiled king: Katherine Philips's society of friendship -- Royalism and the heroic woman -- The self-fashioning of the Restoration woman writer -- Narratives of love and warfare in Philips's 1650s manuscript -- Courting political favour -- The publication of poems (1664) -- Marriage, friendship, and honour

Eros, myth, and monarchy in Aphra Behn -- Gender, myth, and translation -- Gender, authority, and the female sexual subject -- Desire and the uncoupling of myth in Behn's erotic poems -- The woman poet and the female monarch -- The female monarch and the woman poet: Mary of Modena, Anne Killigrew, and Jane Barker -- The imaginary underworld of Mary of Modena's court -- The woman painter and the female hero -- Anne Killigrew as linguistic and political subject at court -- Jane Barker's genres and the late Stuart court -- Poetical recreations -- Barker's landscape of the female body -- Female linguistic authority and the coronation of Orinda

Commands from underground: Barker's manuscript poems -- Queen Anne among the poets -- The glorious revolution as bourgeois marriage -- Queen Anne's two bodies -- Anne's dutiful daughters -- The limits of feminist imperialism -- Anne Finch: gender, politics, and myths of the private self -- Anne Finch and the Catholic Stuarts -- The publicly private Finch and miscellany poems -- Female community and female authority -- Finch's female poetic genealogy.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is a clearly written, well-argued, and informative book about the political and private poems of women in the period following the Restoration. Barash (Seton Hall Univ.) has previously contributed essays to Women, Writing, History, 1640-1740, ed. by Isobel Grundy and Susan Wiseman (1992), and Gulliver's Travels, ed. by Christopher Fox (1995). Here she argues that women poets began as political and/or court writers and that, like their male counterparts, they assumed personas. The distinctive voices these women eventually developed are illustrated by careful examination of manuscript copies and of first editions. Detailed accounts of Mary of Modena as a "model of women's artists," of Katherine Philips as a political writer, and of the literary careers of Jane Barker and Anne Finch strengthen a book that concentrates on writers and contexts without falling victim to theory. Recommended for upper-division undergraduates through faculty. J. Wilkinson; emeritus, Youngstown State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Carol Barash is at Rutgers University, New Jersey.

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