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Nixon's shadow : the history of an image / David Greenberg.

By: Greenberg, David, 1968-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : W.W. Norton, c2003Edition: 1st ed.Description: xxxii, 460 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0393048969 (hardcover); 9780393048964 (hardcover); 0393326160 (pbk.); 9780393326161 (pbk.).Subject(s): Nixon, Richard M. (Richard Milhous), 1913-1994 -- Public opinion | Presidents -- United States -- Biography | Public relations and politics -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Political culture -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Public opinion -- United States -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Politics and government -- 1969-1974 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1945-1989 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1989-DDC classification: 973.924/092 | B Other classification: 15.85 | 05.32
Contents:
The California conservatives : Nixon as populist -- The fifties liberals : Nixon as Tricky Dick -- The new left radicals : Nixon as conspirator -- The Washington press corps : Nixon as news manager -- The loyalists : Nixon as victim -- The psychobiographers : Nixon as madman -- The foreign policy crowd : Nixon as statesman -- The historians : Nixon as liberal -- Epilogue : Nixon as comeback artist.
Summary: Looks at different images of and perspectives on Richard Nixon that were created and disseminated in American culture and explains how these images have transformed the way in which Americans view politics and politicians.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E856 .G747 2003 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001638022

Includes bibliographical references (p. 401-429) and index.

The California conservatives : Nixon as populist -- The fifties liberals : Nixon as Tricky Dick -- The new left radicals : Nixon as conspirator -- The Washington press corps : Nixon as news manager -- The loyalists : Nixon as victim -- The psychobiographers : Nixon as madman -- The foreign policy crowd : Nixon as statesman -- The historians : Nixon as liberal -- Epilogue : Nixon as comeback artist.

Looks at different images of and perspectives on Richard Nixon that were created and disseminated in American culture and explains how these images have transformed the way in which Americans view politics and politicians.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Theodore White, the late, respected political pundit, called Franklin Roosevelt and Richard Nixon "the most enduring American politicians of the 20th century." In this vibrant account of Richard Nixon as a cultural icon-the first book on this subject-Slate.com columnist Greenberg shows why White's summation aptly applies to Nixon. This investigation demonstrates how Nixon's sympathizers-conservatives, loyalists, and members of the foreign policy establishment-and his detractors-psychobiographers, the New Left, and liberals-responded to his political shape shifting. Ultimately, Nixon was less than successful at crafting a statesman image to hide his "tricky Dick" reputation, which was burnished by the Watergate scandal, asserts Greenberg. Included here are many anecdotes of how Nixon is portrayed in novels, films, television, popular music, poetry, and even opera. Revisionist historians during the 1990s recast Nixon as a kind of liberal, which shows that Nixon's shadows continue to change a decade after his death. This social history reveals Nixon's complex public and political personas as no chronological biography has done to date. Highly recommended for most public library and all academic collections. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 5/15/03.]-Karl Helicher, Upper Merion Twp. Lib., King of Prussia, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Thirty years after his ignominious resignation, Richard Nixon continues to fascinate scholars. Journalist and Yale historian Greenberg presents a complex, ambitious attempt to explain how Nixon "was perceived and understood by different groups of people throughout his career and afterward." He examines Nixon's life and times, particularly the political culture out of which he emerged as one of the key cold warriors in the 1950s, and he charts his political strategies, tactics, and intoxicating victories and humiliating defeats through the tumultuous 1960s, his rise to the presidency and the zenith of his power in the early 1970s, his fall from grace during Watergate, and his subsequent 20-year attempt to rehabilitate his legacy. Greenberg incorporates a huge range of sources--movies, plays, psychobiography, reminiscences of associates, Nixon's many memoirs and speeches, the infamous Watergate tapes, interviews with supporters, print and television journalism. The result is an imaginative work, enhanced by photos and an extensive bibliography, which comments as much on Nixon's many personae as it does on the transformation of American "image" politics in the last half-century. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. K. Edgerton Montana State University at Billings

Author notes provided by Syndetics

David Greenberg, an historian, is a columnist for Slate and a professor at Yale University. Formerly acting editor of The New Republic, he has written for many publications including The Atlantic, the New York Times, and the Washington Post

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