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African voices in the African American heritage / Betty M. Kuyk.

By: Kuyk, Betty M, 1934-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c2003Description: xxviii, 256 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 025334204X (alk. paper); 9780253342041 (alk. paper); 0253215765 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780253215765 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): United States -- Civilization -- African influences | African Americans -- Social life and customs | African American arts | African Americans -- Relations with Africans | Africans -- United States -- History | Africans -- United States -- Social life and customs | Slavery -- Social aspects -- United States -- History | Slave trade -- Social aspects -- United States -- History | Sea Islands -- Civilization | Southern States -- CivilizationAdditional physical formats: Online version:: African voices in the African American heritage.DDC classification: 973/.0496073 LOC classification: E185 | .K89 2003
Contents:
List of color plates (Sam Doyle, Ralph Griffin, Bill Traylor) -- Foreward / Robert Farris Thimpson -- Interpenetrating themes -- Crossing the Middle Passage -- Into the American community -- Voices of survival -- Sea Islands voices -- African resonance -- To build a nation.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E185 .K89 2003 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001639426

Includes bibliographical references (p. [225]-239) and index.

List of color plates (Sam Doyle, Ralph Griffin, Bill Traylor) -- Foreward / Robert Farris Thimpson -- Interpenetrating themes -- Crossing the Middle Passage -- Into the American community -- Voices of survival -- Sea Islands voices -- African resonance -- To build a nation.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Basing much of the framework of her book on the historical accounts of Sam Gadsden, a grandson and great-grandson of African-born slaves, author-historian Kuyk attempts to explain how African traditions and religious beliefs served as the foundation on which the order of African American community life was established. Examining both linguistics and the visual arts, Kuyk paints a compelling, although too often tedious, portrait of how these newly formed African American communities developed as an outgrowth of Africans and African Americans becoming free to organize their own societal structures. While the information Kuyk offers is both interesting and well researched, it tends to be material not likely to draw attention from a broad range of students and faculty. The problem is that the book caters to an audience so specific that, as a general read, it tends to get bogged down in minutiae that has little appeal to those not steeped in the academic fields of linguistics or African studies. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Graduate students and faculty. W. Edwards SUNY College at Old Westbury

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