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On the farm front : the Women's Land Army in World War II / Stephanie A. Carpenter.

By: Carpenter, Stephanie A.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: DeKalb : Northern Illinois University Press, c2003Description: 214 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0875803148 (alk. paper); 9780875803142 (alk. paper); 0875803040 (alk. paper); 9780875803043 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Women's Land Army (United States) -- History | World War, 1939-1945 -- Food supply -- United States | World War, 1939-1945 -- Women -- United States | Agriculture -- Economic aspects -- United States | Food supply -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Women farmers -- United StatesDDC classification: 940.53/082/0973 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Introduction -- Part I: Creating the women's land army -- Prewar precendents -- The federal government and the WLA -- "Now we're set"-outfitting the WLA -- "Pitch in and help"-calling women to farms -- -- Part II: The women's land army in action -- The east-Dorothy Thompson led the way -- The west-"ho! for a tall glass of lemonade!" -- The midwest-in the house or in the fields -- The south-when race and class get in the way -- The WLA and postwar women
Review: "The Women's Land Army sent volunteers to farms, canneries, and dairies across the country, where they accounted for a great proportion of wartime agricultural workers. On The Farm Front tells for the first time the remarkable story of these women who worked to ensure both "Freedom From Want" at home and victory abroad.".Summary: "Formed in 1943 as part of the Emergency Farm Labor Program, the WLA placed its workers in areas where American farmers urgently needed assistance. Many farmers in even the most desperate areas, however, initially opposed women working their land. Rual administrators in the Midwest and the South yielded to necessity and employed several hundred thousand women as farm laborers by the end of the war, but those in the Great Plains and eastern Rocky Mountains remained hesitant, suffering serious agricultural and financial losses as a consequence.".Summary: "Carpenter reveals how the WLA revolutionized the national view of farming. By accepting all available women as agricultural workers, farmers abandoned traditional labor and stereotypical social practices. When the WLA officially disbanded in 1945, many of its women chose to remain in their agricultural jobs rather than return to a full-time home life or prewar employment."--BOOK JACKET.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. [191]-203) and index.

Introduction -- Part I: Creating the women's land army -- Prewar precendents -- The federal government and the WLA -- "Now we're set"-outfitting the WLA -- "Pitch in and help"-calling women to farms -- -- Part II: The women's land army in action -- The east-Dorothy Thompson led the way -- The west-"ho! for a tall glass of lemonade!" -- The midwest-in the house or in the fields -- The south-when race and class get in the way -- The WLA and postwar women

"The Women's Land Army sent volunteers to farms, canneries, and dairies across the country, where they accounted for a great proportion of wartime agricultural workers. On The Farm Front tells for the first time the remarkable story of these women who worked to ensure both "Freedom From Want" at home and victory abroad.".

"Formed in 1943 as part of the Emergency Farm Labor Program, the WLA placed its workers in areas where American farmers urgently needed assistance. Many farmers in even the most desperate areas, however, initially opposed women working their land. Rual administrators in the Midwest and the South yielded to necessity and employed several hundred thousand women as farm laborers by the end of the war, but those in the Great Plains and eastern Rocky Mountains remained hesitant, suffering serious agricultural and financial losses as a consequence.".

"Carpenter reveals how the WLA revolutionized the national view of farming. By accepting all available women as agricultural workers, farmers abandoned traditional labor and stereotypical social practices. When the WLA officially disbanded in 1945, many of its women chose to remain in their agricultural jobs rather than return to a full-time home life or prewar employment."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

American involvement in WW II inspired intense patriotic sentiments among its citizens, with military service the most direct response. The result was a shortage of labor throughout the US workforce. Many studies of the home front have focused on industry's efforts to cope with that shortage by recruiting nontraditional workers, creating unprecedented opportunities for women and minorities. Rosie the Riveter became the iconic symbol of the new workforce and is deeply imbedded in the national memory. Carpenter (Murray State Univ.), however, focuses on a different aspect of the labor shortage--the disappearance of agricultural labor. The government addressed that shortage by creating the Emergency Farm Labor Program, and within that agency, the Women's Land Army, which sent about three million women to work on farms and in canneries and dairies. Carpenter carefully studies the bureaucratic tangles of creating the program, the reluctance of some farmers to accept the new workers, and the eventual success of the program. This subject has been overlooked too long in WW II history, and this book helps to provide a better understanding of the US effort to win the war. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All levels and collections. J. P. Sanson Louisiana State University at Alexandria

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Stephanie A. Carpenter is Assistant Professor of History at Murray State University in Kentucky.

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