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Hurry freedom : African Americans in Gold Rush California / Jerry Stanley.

By: Stanley, Jerry, 1941-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Crown Publishers, c2000Edition: 1st ed.Description: 85 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0517800969; 9780517800966; 0517800942 (pbk.); 9780517800942 (pbk.).Subject(s): California -- Gold discoveries -- Juvenile literature | African American pioneers -- California -- History -- 19th century -- Juvenile literature | Gibbs, Mifflin Wistar -- Juvenile literature | African American pioneers -- California -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | California -- Race relations -- Juvenile literatureDDC classification: 979.4/00496073 Other classification: NW 2708
Contents:
We saw a black man straining -- Our hearts soared to the clouds -- See owner inside -- Strong in the spirit of freedom -- A modest request -- Assemble yourselves together -- When each heart was innocent -- Hurry freedom -- Freedom.
Summary: Recounts the history of African Americans in California during the Gold Rush while focusing on the life and work of Mifflin Gibbs.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
979.4 S7882HU (Browse shelf) Available 0000001648906

Includes bibliographical references (p. [81]-82) and index.

We saw a black man straining -- Our hearts soared to the clouds -- See owner inside -- Strong in the spirit of freedom -- A modest request -- Assemble yourselves together -- When each heart was innocent -- Hurry freedom -- Freedom.

Recounts the history of African Americans in California during the Gold Rush while focusing on the life and work of Mifflin Gibbs.

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School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-8-More than just a look at life in Gold Rush California, Stanley's brief, fascinating account provides a microcosmic look at the early African-American experience that will most likely have a profound effect on readers. Lured by possible riches and most importantly, opportunity, blacks migrated to California. Unfortunately, the arduous journey across the Oregon and Gila Trails did not affect their position in society. Despite an overwhelmingly racist atmosphere, a few African Americans managed to eke out livings and prevail against injustice. Stanley draws upon the personal experiences of two little-known figures, Mifflin Gibbs and Peter Lester, to exemplify the experience. This narrative choice lends the book a biographical feel rendering it highly readable. Both Gibbs and Lester ultimately succeeded through extremely hard work; as prosperous businessmen they used their shop as a station on the Underground Railroad and furtively lobbied to pass bills that would improve black Californians' lives. Good-quality, archival photos fill the pages. Some of them portray blacks and whites working side by side, others exemplify the time and culture discussed throughout the book. As the title suggests, the focus remains on African Americans, yet Stanley does note that Asian Americans and other minority groups also endured mistreatment at this time. A fine addition.-Laura Glaser, Euless Junior High School, TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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