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Power and protest : global revolution and the rise of detente / Jeremi Suri.

By: Suri, Jeremi.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2003Description: viii, 355 p., [12] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0674010310 (alk. paper); 9780674010314 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Detente | World politics -- 1965-1975 | Student movements -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Social conditions -- 1960-1980 | China -- Social conditions -- 1949- | Soviet Union -- Social conditions -- 1945-1991 | Europe -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Protest movements -- United States | Protest movements -- EuropeAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Power and protest.DDC classification: 909.82/6 Other classification: 15.50
Contents:
The strains of nuclear destruction -- Political constraints and personal charisma -- The language of dissent -- The illiberal consequences of liberal empire -- The global disruption of 1968 -- The diplomacy and domestic politics of detente -- Conclusion.
Review: "Jeremi Suri puts the tumultuous 1960s into a truly international perspective in the first study to examine the connections between great power diplomacy and global social protest. Profoundly disturbed by increasing social and political discontent, Cold War powers united on the international front, in the policy of detente. Though reflecting traditional balance of power considerations, detente thus also developed from a common urge for stability among leaders who by the late 1960s were worried about increasingly threatening domestic social activism." "In the early part of the decade, Cold War pressures simultaneously inspired activists and constrained leaders; within a few years activism turned revolutionary on a global scale. Suri examines the decade through leaders and protesters on three continents, including Mao Zedong, Charles de Gaulle, Martin Luther King Jr., Daniel Cohn-Bendit, and Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. He describes connections between policy and protest from the Berkeley riots to the Prague Spring, from the Paris strikes to massive unrest in Wuhan, China." "Designed to protect the existing political order and repress movements for change, detente gradually isolated politics from the public. The growth of distrust and disillusion in nearly every society left a lasting legacy of global unrest, fragmentation, and unprecedented public skepticism toward authority."--BOOK JACKET.
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D765 .R596 2003 Hitler strikes Poland : D804.J3 B73 2003 Flyboys : D810 .W7 C368 2003 On the farm front : D849 .S83 2003 Power and protest : DA1 .P38 2002 Nobody's perfect : DA16 .C47 V. 1 A history of the English-speaking peoples. DA16 .C47 V. 2 A history of the English-speaking peoples.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 335-340) and index.

The strains of nuclear destruction -- Political constraints and personal charisma -- The language of dissent -- The illiberal consequences of liberal empire -- The global disruption of 1968 -- The diplomacy and domestic politics of detente -- Conclusion.

"Jeremi Suri puts the tumultuous 1960s into a truly international perspective in the first study to examine the connections between great power diplomacy and global social protest. Profoundly disturbed by increasing social and political discontent, Cold War powers united on the international front, in the policy of detente. Though reflecting traditional balance of power considerations, detente thus also developed from a common urge for stability among leaders who by the late 1960s were worried about increasingly threatening domestic social activism." "In the early part of the decade, Cold War pressures simultaneously inspired activists and constrained leaders; within a few years activism turned revolutionary on a global scale. Suri examines the decade through leaders and protesters on three continents, including Mao Zedong, Charles de Gaulle, Martin Luther King Jr., Daniel Cohn-Bendit, and Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. He describes connections between policy and protest from the Berkeley riots to the Prague Spring, from the Paris strikes to massive unrest in Wuhan, China." "Designed to protect the existing political order and repress movements for change, detente gradually isolated politics from the public. The growth of distrust and disillusion in nearly every society left a lasting legacy of global unrest, fragmentation, and unprecedented public skepticism toward authority."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In clear and concise prose, Suri (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison) tells the tale of the stalemate in the Cold War, the rise of global protest in the 1960s, and the coming of detente as a conservative reaction to these events. He sees JFK and Khrushchev as among the first to use the old rhetoric of energetic democracy and revolutionary communism, respectively, while working to exercise restraint over both their nations and allies, a fact noticed by dissident groups in the US, Europe, and Asia. The watershed year is 1968, when Berkeley, West Berlin, Washington, Paris, Prague, and Wuhan, China were all convulsed by protests that added up to "global disruption." The reaction was, Suri argues, detente. Rejecting the traditional balance of power, he uses instead the "balance of order" to describe the emerging common interest. Thereafter, Nixon, Brezhnev, Mao, and Willy Brandt worked in concert to stabilize their societies, avoid direct challenges, increase secrecy, secure arms control, and repair their personal images through treaties and summits. On the one hand, this interpretation provides a new paradigm for global diplomatic history. On the other, readers may struggle to find many direct connections between the protest and the national policy shifts engendered. However, in the final analysis, this is an indispensable new work. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All levels and libraries. C. W. Haury Piedmont Virginia Community College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jeremi Suri is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin, Madison

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