Normal view MARC view ISBD view

At America's gates : Chinese immigration during the exclusion era, 1882-1943 / Erika Lee.

By: Lee, Erika.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2003Description: 331 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0807827754 (alk. paper); 0807854484 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Chinese Americans -- Social conditions -- 19th century | Chinese Americans -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Chinese Americans -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- History | Immigrants -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Immigrants -- United States -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Emigration and immigration -- History | China -- Emigration and immigration -- History | United States -- Emigration and immigration -- Government policy | United States -- Race relations
Contents:
Introduction -- PART I: CLOSING THE GATES: The Chinese are coming: how can we stop them? : Chinese exclusion and the origins of American gatekeeping -- The keepers of the gate: U.S. immigration officials and Chinese exclusion -- PART II: AT AMERICA'S GATES: Exclusion Acts: Race, class, gender, and citizenship in the enforcement of the exclusion laws -- One hundred kinds of oppressive laws: the Chinese response to American exclusion -- PART III: CRACKS IN THE GATE: Enforcing the borders: Chinese exclusion along the U.S.-Canadian and U.S.-Mexican borders -- The crooked path: Chinese illegal immigration and its consequences -- PART IV: THE CONSEQUENCES AND LEGACIES OF EXCLUSION: In the shadow of exclusion: The impact of exclusion on the Chinese in America -- EPILOGUE: Echoes of exclusion in the late Twentieth Century -- AFTERWORD: Following September 11, 2001.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Longview campus
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E184 .C5 L523 2003 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001646710

Includes bibliographical references (p. 295-310) and index.

Introduction -- PART I: CLOSING THE GATES: The Chinese are coming: how can we stop them? : Chinese exclusion and the origins of American gatekeeping -- The keepers of the gate: U.S. immigration officials and Chinese exclusion -- PART II: AT AMERICA'S GATES: Exclusion Acts: Race, class, gender, and citizenship in the enforcement of the exclusion laws -- One hundred kinds of oppressive laws: the Chinese response to American exclusion -- PART III: CRACKS IN THE GATE: Enforcing the borders: Chinese exclusion along the U.S.-Canadian and U.S.-Mexican borders -- The crooked path: Chinese illegal immigration and its consequences -- PART IV: THE CONSEQUENCES AND LEGACIES OF EXCLUSION: In the shadow of exclusion: The impact of exclusion on the Chinese in America -- EPILOGUE: Echoes of exclusion in the late Twentieth Century -- AFTERWORD: Following September 11, 2001.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Lee's book is an important study on Chinese exclusion and its importance for nation building and US immigration policy. She breaks new ground in several ways. First, Lee (Univ. of Minnesota) follows what happened after exclusion was achieved in 1882 and points out that the Chinese resisted by immigrating illegally through Canada and Mexico and other means. Second, she challenges conventional scholarship, which sees the anti-Chinese movement as peripheral to the setting of national immigration policy. Instead, Lee states that the race and class arguments about the nonassimilability of the Chinese were eventually extended to Africans, Mexicans, and, eventually, European immigrants as well. Third, she claims that the enforcement of Chinese exclusion promoted state building--the expansion, centralization, and bureaucratization of the federal government. Interestingly, local immigration officials, particularly those like John H. Wise and others in San Francisco, played a key role in the development of national immigration law and practice. Lee's careful archival work and mastery of relevant literature is evident, and her study is especially poignant because of its tie to her family's history. This is an impressive and sophisticated monograph, suitable for a general audience. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All libraries. F. Ng California State University, Fresno

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.