Gone with the wind.

By: Mitchell, Margaret, 1900-1949Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Macmillan, 1964, c1936Description: 1037 p. ; 22 cmISBN: 0025853902; 9780025853904Subject(s): Women -- Georgia -- History -- 19th century -- Fiction | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- FictionAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Gone with the wind.DDC classification: Fic LOC classification: PS3525.I972 | G6 1964Other classification: HU 4539 Summary: After the Civil War sweeps away the genteel life to which she has been accustomed, Scarlett O'Hara sets about to salvage her Georgia plantation home.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS3525.I972 G6 1964 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100251859

After the Civil War sweeps away the genteel life to which she has been accustomed, Scarlett O'Hara sets about to salvage her Georgia plantation home.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

There is a reason for the enduring popularity of this saga: it is a ripping good story, fast moving, replete with battles, romance, intrigue, murder, suspense, and a surprisingly strong feminist theme. For all that, Scarlett is such a simpering "Southern belle," but when the chips are down, she takes charge and gets things done no matter the cost. The theme, after all, is surviving change and overcoming obstacles, and the women do that far better than the men (remember poor Ashley?). The audiobook, of course, is far richer than the movie could be; richer characterizations, deeper scene setting and examination of the role of women in the sociology of the South, heart-wrenching descriptions of the carnage of war, and a generally carefully researched history of the period, with many events and even characters that do not appear in the film. To modern ears the language is shocking: pickaninnies, black bucks, darkies (and worse), but this sort of nonchalant racism serves to create the flavor of the times and a better understanding of the pre- and postwar South. Narrator Linda Stephens gets about a B minus; her Scarlett is near perfect, and her other white female Southerners are good, but the white males sound a bit too female, the Northerners sound Southern, and her black characters are just dreadful. There are lots of familiar lines (yes, Rhett really does say he doesn't give a damn) and scenes, and one is struck by how closely the film actors match the authors' descriptions of their characters (or maybe 60-odd years of "knowing" what they look like interferes). All in all, listeners intrepid enough to take this on will not be disappointed. Harriet Edwards, East Meadow P.L., NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Margaret Mitchell, 1900 - 1949 Novelist Margaret Mitchell was born November 8, 1900 in Atlanta, Georgia to Eugene Muse Mitchell, a prominent attorney, and Maybelle Stephens Mitchell, a suffragette. She attended Smith College from 1918-1919 to study psychiatry, but she had to return to Atlanta when her mother died during the great flu epidemic of 1918. In 1922, she married Red Upshaw but left him three months later and had the marriage annulled. In 1925, she married John Marsh, the best man at her first wedding. He died in 1952.

Mitchell joined the prestigious Debutante Club, but her public drinking, smoking and her performance of an Apache dance in a sensual costume, ended that for her. She was refused membership to the Atlanta Junior League. She began her writing career as a feature writer for the Atlanta Journal. She authored a freelance column for the paper called Elizabeth Bennett's Gossip.

Mitchell is the author of the best selling novel of all time, "Gone with the Wind" (1936). In 1939, the film version was a smash hit and it received ten Academy Awards. Scarlett's original name was Pansy, which was also the book's working title, but editors insisted that it would be changed because of its use in the North to refer to homosexuals. Other early titles of the book were "Tote the Weary Load" and "Tomorrow Is Another Day." It is believed that the character Rhett Butler was inspired by her first husband Red Upshaw, and the character Ashley Wilkes was inspired by her first fiance, the attractive and idealistic Lieutenant Clifford Henry. Henry was killed in France during World War I and Mitchell declared him as the one great love of her life.

On August 16, 1949, Margaret Mitchell died of injuries she received when she was hit by an intoxicated cabdriver while crossing Peachtree Street in Atlanta. She was mourned by so many that tickets had to be distributed for the funeral. Published posthumously was "Lost Laysen" (1996), which was a novella Mitchell wrote in 1915, at the age of fifteen, as a gift for her boyfriend.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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