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Roll, Jordan, roll : the world the slaves made / Eugene D. Genovese.

By: Genovese, Eugene D, 1930-2012.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Vintage Books, [1974]Copyright date: ©1974Description: xxii, 823 pages ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0394716523 (pbk.); 9780394716527 (pbk.).Subject(s): Slaves -- United States -- Social conditions | African Americans -- United States -- History | Slavery -- United States -- History | GeschichteAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Roll, Jordan, roll.DDC classification: 975/.004/96073 Other classification: 15.85 | 89.91 | NW 8295 | 15.87
Contents:
Bk. I. God is not mocked. part 1. Of the willing and the obedient. On paternalism ; Farmers, planters, and overseers ; The hegemonic function of the law ; In the name of humanity and the cause of reform ; Our Black family ; A duty and a burden ; Of concubines and horses ; The moment of truth -- part 2. And the children bought up. To the manor born ; De good massa ; Our white folks ; Some valiant soldier here -- Bk. II. The rock and the church. part 1. Of the God of the living. The Christian tradition ; Slave religion in hemispheric perspective ; Black conversation and white sensibility ; Let the dead bury the dead ; The white preachers ; Origins of the folk religion ; The gospel in the quarters ; The Black preachers ; Religious foundations of the Black nation -- part 2. And every man according as his work shall be. Time and work rhythms ; A "lazy" people ; The Black work ethic -- Bk. III. The valley of the shadow. pt. 1. Of the sons of Jacob. Life in the big house ; The men between ; Men of skill ; Free Negroes ; Miscegenation ; The language of class and nation ; A conclusion and a preface -- pt. 2. And the coat of many colors. The naming of cats ; The myth of the absent family ; Romances of the field ; Broomsticks and orange blossoms ; Husbands and fathers ; Wives and mothers ; The children ; The old folks ; Hearth and home ; Gardens ; Kitchens, high and low ; Clothes make the man and the woman ; Reading, writing, and prospects ; De big times -- Bk. IV. Whom God hath hedged in. The slave revolts ; On resistance ; "Roast pig is a wonderful delicacy, especially when stolen" ; Standing up to the man ; Brothers, sisters, and no-'counts ; "All Negroes are fatalists" ; The runaways ; The bright and morning star -- Appendix : The fate of paternalism in modern bourgeois society : the case of Japan.
Awards: Bancroft Prize, 1975.Summary: A profound, learned and detailed analysis of Negro slavery. It covers an incredible range of topics and offers fresh insights on nearly every page ... the author's great gift is his ability to penetrate the minds of bothslaves and masters, revealing not only how they viewed themselves and each other, but also how they contradictory perceptions interacted.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E443 .G46 1976 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001812940
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E443 .G46 1976 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001652148

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Bk. I. God is not mocked. part 1. Of the willing and the obedient. On paternalism ; Farmers, planters, and overseers ; The hegemonic function of the law ; In the name of humanity and the cause of reform ; Our Black family ; A duty and a burden ; Of concubines and horses ; The moment of truth -- part 2. And the children bought up. To the manor born ; De good massa ; Our white folks ; Some valiant soldier here -- Bk. II. The rock and the church. part 1. Of the God of the living. The Christian tradition ; Slave religion in hemispheric perspective ; Black conversation and white sensibility ; Let the dead bury the dead ; The white preachers ; Origins of the folk religion ; The gospel in the quarters ; The Black preachers ; Religious foundations of the Black nation -- part 2. And every man according as his work shall be. Time and work rhythms ; A "lazy" people ; The Black work ethic -- Bk. III. The valley of the shadow. pt. 1. Of the sons of Jacob. Life in the big house ; The men between ; Men of skill ; Free Negroes ; Miscegenation ; The language of class and nation ; A conclusion and a preface -- pt. 2. And the coat of many colors. The naming of cats ; The myth of the absent family ; Romances of the field ; Broomsticks and orange blossoms ; Husbands and fathers ; Wives and mothers ; The children ; The old folks ; Hearth and home ; Gardens ; Kitchens, high and low ; Clothes make the man and the woman ; Reading, writing, and prospects ; De big times -- Bk. IV. Whom God hath hedged in. The slave revolts ; On resistance ; "Roast pig is a wonderful delicacy, especially when stolen" ; Standing up to the man ; Brothers, sisters, and no-'counts ; "All Negroes are fatalists" ; The runaways ; The bright and morning star -- Appendix : The fate of paternalism in modern bourgeois society : the case of Japan.

A profound, learned and detailed analysis of Negro slavery. It covers an incredible range of topics and offers fresh insights on nearly every page ... the author's great gift is his ability to penetrate the minds of bothslaves and masters, revealing not only how they viewed themselves and each other, but also how they contradictory perceptions interacted.

Bancroft Prize, 1975.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Born in Brooklyn, New York, Eugene Genovese was educated at Brooklyn College and Columbia University, where he received his Ph.D. in 1959. He has served as Pitt Professor of American History at Cambridge University and Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the University Center in Georgia. <p> An erudite, unconventional, and often unpredictable Marxist, Genovese has forced historians of the Old South---and especially of slavery---to think in new ways about important questions. Ranging over a multitude of topics, his work is concerned mainly with the relationship between economic factors, social conditions, and culture. Of his best-known work. Roll, Jordan, Roll (1974), David Brion Davis wrote: "Genovese's great gift is his ability to penetrate the minds of both slaves and masters, revealing not only how they viewed themselves and each other, but also how their contradictory perceptions interacted" (N.Y. Times Book Review). <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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