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Europe's last summer : who started the Great War in 1914? / David Fromkin.

By: Fromkin, David.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Knopf : Distributed by Random House, 2004Edition: 1st ed.Description: xi, 349 p. : ill., 1 map ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0375411569; 9780375411564.Other title: Who started the Great War in 1914?.Subject(s): World War, 1914-1918 -- CausesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Europe's last summer.DDC classification: 940.3/11 Other classification: 15.70
Contents:
Out of the blue -- The importance of the question -- A summer to remember -- Part 1: Europe's tensions -- 1. Empires clash -- 2. Classes struggle -- 3. Nations quarrel -- 4. Countries arm -- 5. Zarathustra prophesies -- 6. Diplomats align -- Part 2: Walking through minefields -- 7. The eastern question -- 8. A challenge for the Archduke -- 9. Explosive Germany -- Part 3: Drifting toward war -- 10. Macedonia-out of control -- 11. Austria-first off the mark -- 12. France and Germany make their play -- 13. Italy grasps: then the Balkans do too -- 14. The Slavic tide -- 15. Europe goes to the brink -- 16. More Balkan tremors -- 17. An American tries to stop it -- Part 4: Murder! -- 18. The last waltz -- 19. In the land of the assassins -- 20. The Russian connection -- 21. The terrorists strike -- 22. Europe yawns -- 23. Disposing of the bodies -- 24. Rounding up the suspects -- Part 5: Telling lies -- 25: Germany signs a blank check -- 26. The great deception -- 27. Berchtold runs out of time -- 28. The secret is kept -- Part 6: Crisis! -- 29. The fait is not accompli -- 30. Presenting an ultimatum -- 31. Serbia more or less accepts -- Part 7: Countdown -- 32. Showdown in Berlin -- 33. July 26 -- 34. July 27 -- 35. July 28 -- 36. July 29 -- 37. July 30 -- 38. July 31 -- 39. August 1 -- 40. August 2 -- 41. August 3 -- 42. August 4 -- 43. Shredding the evidence -- Part 8: The mystery solved -- 44. Assembling in the library -- 45. What did not happen -- 46. The key to what happened -- 47. What was it about? -- 48. Who could have prevented it? -- 49. Who started it? -- 50. Could it happen again? -- 51. Summing up -- 52. Austria's war -- 53. Germany's war.
Summary: Draws on current scholarship to argue that hostilities that led to World War I were started intentionally, describing the negotiations and personalities of key leaders that contributed to the failure of diplomatic efforts.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D511 .F746 2004 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001652981

Includes bibliographical references (p. 331-336) and index.

Out of the blue -- The importance of the question -- A summer to remember -- Part 1: Europe's tensions -- 1. Empires clash -- 2. Classes struggle -- 3. Nations quarrel -- 4. Countries arm -- 5. Zarathustra prophesies -- 6. Diplomats align -- Part 2: Walking through minefields -- 7. The eastern question -- 8. A challenge for the Archduke -- 9. Explosive Germany -- Part 3: Drifting toward war -- 10. Macedonia-out of control -- 11. Austria-first off the mark -- 12. France and Germany make their play -- 13. Italy grasps: then the Balkans do too -- 14. The Slavic tide -- 15. Europe goes to the brink -- 16. More Balkan tremors -- 17. An American tries to stop it -- Part 4: Murder! -- 18. The last waltz -- 19. In the land of the assassins -- 20. The Russian connection -- 21. The terrorists strike -- 22. Europe yawns -- 23. Disposing of the bodies -- 24. Rounding up the suspects -- Part 5: Telling lies -- 25: Germany signs a blank check -- 26. The great deception -- 27. Berchtold runs out of time -- 28. The secret is kept -- Part 6: Crisis! -- 29. The fait is not accompli -- 30. Presenting an ultimatum -- 31. Serbia more or less accepts -- Part 7: Countdown -- 32. Showdown in Berlin -- 33. July 26 -- 34. July 27 -- 35. July 28 -- 36. July 29 -- 37. July 30 -- 38. July 31 -- 39. August 1 -- 40. August 2 -- 41. August 3 -- 42. August 4 -- 43. Shredding the evidence -- Part 8: The mystery solved -- 44. Assembling in the library -- 45. What did not happen -- 46. The key to what happened -- 47. What was it about? -- 48. Who could have prevented it? -- 49. Who started it? -- 50. Could it happen again? -- 51. Summing up -- 52. Austria's war -- 53. Germany's war.

Draws on current scholarship to argue that hostilities that led to World War I were started intentionally, describing the negotiations and personalities of key leaders that contributed to the failure of diplomatic efforts.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Author of A Peace To End All Peace, a New York Times best book in 1989, Fromkin here argues that World War I was an inferno set deliberately. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

According to Fromkin, historians, largely inspired by Fritz Fischer, have substantially revised the traditional view of Sidney Fay that WW I was accidental. The new view, however, holding Germany and Austria clearly responsible, "has not percolated effectively into the consciousness of the wider public." Fromkin, a lawyer turned professor of international relations, history, and law at Boston Univ., summarizes this perspective, saying the key to understanding the cause is that there were two wars, the local one between Austria-Hungary and Serbia, and the war for European supremacy between Germany and Russia, which then merged and enveloped the world in the bitter struggle known as the Great War. The military staffs (not the governments) of Austria-Hungary and Germany wanted war and made their decisions to start before the triggering events occurred, which they said forced their hands. The author has written several books similar in style that have been well received. This book, clearly intended for the "wider public" rather than for serious students of history, is simply and repetitively written and has few notes, short chapters, a small bibliography, and no reference to archival material. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Public and undergraduate collections. C. R. Lovin emeritus, Western Carolina University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

David Henry Fromkin was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on August 27, 1932. He received a bachelor's degree from the University of Chicago and a law degree from the University of Chicago Law School. He worked as a lawyer and investor until becoming a published author in his 40s and a professor in his 60s. He wrote seven books including The Question of Government: An Inquiry into the Breakdown of Modern Political Systems; A Peace to End All Peace; In the Time of the Americans: F.D.R., Truman, Eisenhower, Marshall, MacArthur - the Generation that Changed America's Role in the World; Kosovo Crossing: The Reality of American Intervention in the Balkans; Europe's Last Summer: Who Started the Great War in 1914?; and The King and the Cowboy: Theodore Roosevelt and Edward the Seventh, Secret Partners. He was a professor at Boston University from 1994 until 2013. He died from heart failure on June 11, 2017 at the age of 84. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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