Made in Texas : George W. Bush and the Southern takeover of American politics / Michael Lind.

By: Lind, Michael, 1962-Material type: TextTextSeries: New America book: Publisher: New York : Basic Books, c2003Description: xv, 201 p. : map ; 25 cmISBN: 0465041213 (alk. paper); 9780465041213 (alk. paper)Subject(s): Texas -- Politics and government -- 1951- | Texas -- Politics and government -- Philosophy | Political culture -- Texas | Political culture -- United States | United States -- Politics and government -- 1989- | United States -- Politics and government -- 1945-1989 | United States -- Politics and government -- Philosophy | Bush, George W. (George Walker), 1946- -- Influence | Politicians -- Texas -- History -- 20th century | Politicians -- United States -- History -- 20th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Made in Texas.DDC classification: 306.20973 LOC classification: F391.2 | .L56 2003Other classification: 89.11 | 89.40
Contents:
A tale of two ranches -- The Confederate century -- Philip Dru, Texan -- Southernomics -- That old time religion -- Armageddon -- A choice of traditions.
Summary: Describes the political culture and tradition of Texas and how it has influenced George W. Bush, the country, and the world.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F391.2 .L56 2003 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001661008

Includes bibliographical references and index.

A tale of two ranches -- The Confederate century -- Philip Dru, Texan -- Southernomics -- That old time religion -- Armageddon -- A choice of traditions.

Describes the political culture and tradition of Texas and how it has influenced George W. Bush, the country, and the world.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Lind (Up from Conservatism), a senior fellow at the New America Foundation, suggests that "by the time George W. Bush ran for president in 2000, the Southernization of the Republican Party was complete." He further argues that the current occupant of the White House practices a particularly Texan version of Southern politics. There used to be two traditions of Texas politics: the traditionalists and the modernists, with George W. Bush exemplifying the traditionalists and Lyndon Johnson the modernists. Lind now believes that the traditionalists-characterized by a belief in "minimal government at home and a bellicose foreign policy abroad with religious fundamentalism"-have taken over not only Texas politics but U.S. politics as well. These new power brokers are "the rural, the religious, and the white," Lind argues, and "the Texan conservatism of George W. Bush combines seventeenth-century religion, eighteenth-century economics, and nineteenth-century imperialism." Forcefully argued, Lind's work presents a devastating critique of the politics of the Bush presidency, one that is at once convincing and alarming. Suitable for all public and academic libraries.-Michael A. Genovese, Loyola Marymount Univ. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Lind offers a stinging and jaundiced condemnation of President George W. Bush and his administration. His book is a well-footnoted contemporary political history, but since Lind, a native Texas intellectual and political journalist, so stridently denounces conservative Texas, Bush, and Republican politics, the book is journalistically editorial as well. Lind divides Texas into two traditions. The first is modern progressive Texas characterized by Lyndon B. Johnson. He maintains that the Bush presidency marks the takeover of American politics by another Texas tradition: a "byproduct of the hierarchical plantation system, ... a cruel caste society ..." dominated "by a callous oligarchy of rich white families...." Lind traces the roots of southern conservatism and fundamentalism that he contends informs Bush. Bush's conservatism is characterized by malignant elitism, the plunder of natural resources and land, exploitation of cheap labor, and unilateral preemptive imperialism. Texas's primitive commodity-based crony-capitalism retarded the development of the Texas economy; now President Bush endeavors to impose this socioeconomic system on the whole country. This short book is controversial and sure to spark heated debate. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. General readers and upper- and lower-division undergraduate collections. J. A. Norris Texas A&M International University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michael Lind, a senior fellow of the New America Foundation lives in Washington, D.C.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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