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Extraordinary measures : Afrocentric modernism and twentieth-century American poetry / Lorenzo Thomas.

By: Thomas, Lorenzo, 1944-2005.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Modern and contemporary poetics: Publisher: Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2000Description: xiv, 271 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0817310142 (alk. paper); 9780817310141 (alk. paper); 0817310150 (pbk.); 9780817310158 (pbk.).Subject(s): American poetry -- African American authors -- History and criticism | American poetry -- 20th century -- History and criticism | African Americans -- Intellectual life -- 20th century | Modernism (Literature) -- United States | American poetry -- African influences | African Americans in literatureAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Extraordinary measures.DDC classification: 811/.509896073 LOC classification: PS310.N4 | T48 2000Also issued online.
Contents:
Fenton Johnson : the high cost of militance -- William Stanley Braithwaite and Harriet Monroe : the battle for new poetry -- Margaret Walker and the contest to define America -- Literary criticism and the color line : Melvin B. Tolson's eloquent accommodations -- Roots of the Black Arts movement : New York in the 1960s -- Amiri Baraka : gathering the spirits -- A change is gonna come : Black voices of Louisiana -- Neon griot : the functional role of poetry readings -- At the edge of the twenty-first century.
Summary: "Revives and appraises the writings of a number of this century's most important African American poets."--cover.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS310 .N4 T48 2000 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001665777

Includes bibliographical references (p. [237]-260) and index.

Fenton Johnson : the high cost of militance -- William Stanley Braithwaite and Harriet Monroe : the battle for new poetry -- Margaret Walker and the contest to define America -- Literary criticism and the color line : Melvin B. Tolson's eloquent accommodations -- Roots of the Black Arts movement : New York in the 1960s -- Amiri Baraka : gathering the spirits -- A change is gonna come : Black voices of Louisiana -- Neon griot : the functional role of poetry readings -- At the edge of the twenty-first century.

Also issued online.

"Revives and appraises the writings of a number of this century's most important African American poets."--cover.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In this volume, well-regarded poet Thomas (English, Univ. of Houston) examines African American poetry in the 20th century, ranging from the Harlem Renaissance through the Black Arts movement to contemporary poetry slams. He provides perceptive, jargon-free readings of numerous texts while demonstrating how black writers have negotiated an often tenuous balance between the goals of modernism and their own views of race and class. In doing so, Thomas makes a convincing case for a continuum within the African American poetic tradition. His provocative readings invite us to re-examine the ways in which writers as diverse as Fenton Johnson, William Stanley Braithwiate, Margaret Walker, Amiri Baraka, Alvin Aubert, and Harryette Mullen use their art. Recommended for all libraries with an interest in poetry and/or African American literature.DLouis J. Parascandola, Long Island Univ., Brooklyn Campus (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Beginning with Phillis Wheatley (1753-84), Thomas gives a scholarly view of the "whole voice" of African American poets, chronicling their academic, social, and artistic marginality in the face of their enforced marginality in the American canon and American society. According to Thomas, the Afrocentric view discredits the assumptions that fuel racism and plays a crucial part in literary circles in demolishing Eurocentric perspective and creating a true American perspective. This volume is especially significant because of the poets Thomas examines--among them, Fenton Johnson, William Stanley Braithwaite, Margaret Walker, Melvin B. Tolson, and Amiri Baraka. The chapters on Johnson and Braithwaite break new ground in the scholarly evaluation of these poets, who have been neglected by the critical community. In addition, Thomas examines the black arts movement of the 1960s, Louisiana poets, and poetry readings; he closes with a chapter titled "At the Edge of the Twenty-first Century," in which he analyzes the younger poets of the 1990s. Thomas's work fills a critical void in the evaluation of African American poetics; it is a must for all college and university libraries and an extremely useful tool for graduate students and faculty. B. Taylor-Thompson Texas Southern University

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