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The other founders : Anti-Federalism and the dissenting tradition in America, 1788-1828 / by Saul Cornell.

By: Cornell, Saul.
Contributor(s): Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chapel Hill : Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, by the University of North Carolina Press, c1999Description: xvi, 327 p. : maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0807825034 (alk. paper); 9780807825037 (alk. paper); 0807847860 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780807847862 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): United States -- Politics and government -- 1783-1865 | Constitutional history -- United States | Federal government -- United States -- History -- 18th century | Federal government -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Dissenters -- United States -- History -- 18th century | Dissenters -- United States -- History -- 19th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Other founders.DDC classification: 320.473/049 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Ratification and the politics of the public sphere -- Elite Anti-Federalist political and constitutional thought -- Popular Anti-Federalist political and constitutional thought -- Courts, conventions, and constitutionalism: the politics of the public sphere -- The emergence of a loyal opposition -- Anti-Federalist voices within Democratic-Republicanism -- The limits of dissenting constitutionalism -- The founding dialogue and the politics of constitutional interpretation -- Democratic-Republican constitutionalism and the public sphere -- The dissenting tradition, from the revolution of 1800 until nullification -- Anti-Federalism and the American political tradition.
Review: "Fear of centralized authority is deeply rooted in American history. The struggle over the U.S. Constitution in 1788 pitted the Federalists, supporters of a stronger central government, against the Anti-Federalists, the champions of a more localist vision of politics. But, argues Saul Cornell, while the Federalists may have won the battle over ratification, it is the ideas of the Anti-Federalists that continue to define the soul of American politics."--BOOK JACKET.
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Book Longview campus
Stacks - 3rd Floor
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 309-317) and index.

Ratification and the politics of the public sphere -- Elite Anti-Federalist political and constitutional thought -- Popular Anti-Federalist political and constitutional thought -- Courts, conventions, and constitutionalism: the politics of the public sphere -- The emergence of a loyal opposition -- Anti-Federalist voices within Democratic-Republicanism -- The limits of dissenting constitutionalism -- The founding dialogue and the politics of constitutional interpretation -- Democratic-Republican constitutionalism and the public sphere -- The dissenting tradition, from the revolution of 1800 until nullification -- Anti-Federalism and the American political tradition.

"Fear of centralized authority is deeply rooted in American history. The struggle over the U.S. Constitution in 1788 pitted the Federalists, supporters of a stronger central government, against the Anti-Federalists, the champions of a more localist vision of politics. But, argues Saul Cornell, while the Federalists may have won the battle over ratification, it is the ideas of the Anti-Federalists that continue to define the soul of American politics."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this important work, Cornell convincingly asserts that Anti-Federalist ideology was central to the dissenting tradition in late-18th- and early-19th-century American politics. His book begins with a careful examination of divisions among different Anti-Federalist factions. Rather than melting away after the ratification of the Constitution, Anti-Federalist ideology became central to a Democratic-Republican loyal opposition that feared a potentially tyrannical concentration of power in the hands of the central government. James Madison's "Report of 1800," written as a response to the Alien and Sedition Acts, sought to check national power with public opinion expressed through the state legislatures. This effort to steer a middle course between nationalism and localism while simultaneously checking tyranny dominated Jeffersonian views of federalism until the 1820s. The Madisonian synthesis began to unravel with the Marshall Court's decision in McCulloch v. Maryland and further splintered with John C. Calhoun's doctrine of nullification. The author cogently demonstrates the significance of Anti-Federalism to early Republican political thought. This book will become a standard work on the Anti-Federalists and greatly enhances understanding of state's rights thought in the period. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. C. Arndt; James Madison University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Saul Cornell is assistant professor of history at Ohio State University.

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