Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Many thousands gone : the first two centuries of slavery in North America / Ira Berlin.

By: Berlin, Ira, 1941-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1998Description: x, 497 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0674810929 (hardcover); 9780674810921 (hardcover); 0674002113 (pbk.); 9780674002111 (pbk.).Subject(s): Slavery -- United States -- History -- 17th century | Slavery -- United States -- History -- 18th century | African Americans -- Social conditions -- 17th century | African Americans -- Social conditions -- 18th centuryDDC classification: 306.3/62/097309032 Other classification: 15.85 | HD 219 | HD 475 | MS 1660 | NW 8295
Contents:
Emergence of Atlantic Creoles in the Chesapeake -- Expansion of Creole society in the North -- Divergent paths in the lowcountry -- Devolution in the lower Mississippi Valley -- Tobacco revolution in the Chesapeake -- Rice revolution in the lowcountry -- Growth and the transformation of black life in the North --Stagnation and transformation in the lower Mississippi Valley -- Slow death of slavery in the North -- Union of African-American society in the upper South -- Fragmentation in the lower South -- Slavery and freedom in the lower Mississippi Valley.
Summary: This volume sketches the complex evolution of slavery and black society from the first arrivals in the early 1600s through the American Revolution. Today most Americans, black and white, identify slavery with cotton, the deep South, and the African-American church. But at the beginning of the nineteenth century, after almost two hundred years of African-American life in mainland North America, few slaves grew cotton, lived in the deep South, or embraced Christianity. The author demonstrates that earlier North American slavery had many different forms and meanings that varied over time and from place to place. He shows that slavery and race did not have a fixed character that endured for centuries but were constantly being constructed or reconstructed in response to changing historical circumstances. This work illustrates that complex nature of American slavery, the falsity of many of our stereotypes, and the unique world wrought by the slaves themselves.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Awards: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E446 .B49 1998 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001683242

Includes bibliographical references (p. 379-485) and index.

Emergence of Atlantic Creoles in the Chesapeake -- Expansion of Creole society in the North -- Divergent paths in the lowcountry -- Devolution in the lower Mississippi Valley -- Tobacco revolution in the Chesapeake -- Rice revolution in the lowcountry -- Growth and the transformation of black life in the North --Stagnation and transformation in the lower Mississippi Valley -- Slow death of slavery in the North -- Union of African-American society in the upper South -- Fragmentation in the lower South -- Slavery and freedom in the lower Mississippi Valley.

This volume sketches the complex evolution of slavery and black society from the first arrivals in the early 1600s through the American Revolution. Today most Americans, black and white, identify slavery with cotton, the deep South, and the African-American church. But at the beginning of the nineteenth century, after almost two hundred years of African-American life in mainland North America, few slaves grew cotton, lived in the deep South, or embraced Christianity. The author demonstrates that earlier North American slavery had many different forms and meanings that varied over time and from place to place. He shows that slavery and race did not have a fixed character that endured for centuries but were constantly being constructed or reconstructed in response to changing historical circumstances. This work illustrates that complex nature of American slavery, the falsity of many of our stereotypes, and the unique world wrought by the slaves themselves.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Berlin (Free at Last: A Documentary History of Slavery, Freedom, and the Civil War, LJ 12/92) has written an imaginative, detailed account of American slavery from its origins at the beginning of the 17th century through the Revolution. Focusing on regional differences, he examines African American life in the North, the Chesapeake, the Carolina low-country, and the lower Mississippi Valley. His central thesis is that a variety of societies evolved in these regions, some based on slavery, some merely containing the institution. The relationship between blacks and whites was complicated and rich, involving considerable give and take. He concludes that virulent racism developed after the 1820s, when slavery became a more powerful and widespread institution. A major contribution to the study of slavery in the United States.‘Anthony O. Edmonds, Ball State Univ., Muncie, IN (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Ira Berlin was born in New York City on May 27, 1941. He received a bachelor of science degree in chemistry in 1963, a master's degree in history in 1966, and a Ph.D. in history in 1970, all from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle and Federal City College in Washington before becoming a professor at the University of Maryland in 1974. <p> He wrote numerous books including Slaves Without Masters: The Free Negro in the Antebellum South, Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America, and The Long Emancipation: The Demise of Slavery in the United States. He also edited several books including Remembering Slavery: African Americans Talk About Their Personal Experiences of Slavery and Emancipation with Marc Favreau and Steven F. Miller. He died from complications of multiple myeloma on June 5, 2018 at the age of 77. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.