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Into the arms of strangers : stories of the Kindertransport / [edited by] Mark Jonathan Harris and Deborah Oppenheimer ; preface by Lord Richard Attenborough ; introduction by David Cesarani.

Contributor(s): Harris, Mark Jonathan, 1941- | Oppenheimer, Deborah.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York ; London : Bloomsbury Pub. : Distributed to the trade by St. Martin's Press, c2000Edition: 1st US ed.Description: xiii, 292 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 158234101X; 9781582341019.Other title: Arms of strangers | Kindertransport.Subject(s): Jewish children -- Germany -- Biography | Jews -- Germany -- History -- 1933-1945 | Jewish refugees -- Great Britain -- Biography | Jewish children -- Great Britain -- Biography | Jews -- Germany -- Biography | Refugees -- Great Britain -- BiographyDDC classification: 941/.004924/0092 | B
Contents:
When the bough breaks -- The 9th of November -- A light in the darkness -- Last goodbyes -- Into the arms of strangers -- A thousand kisses -- On the shoulders of children -- War and deportation -- Somewhere to belong -- None to comfort them -- Living with the past -- In memory of Sylva Avramovici Oppenheimer, 1928-1993.
Summary: Chronicles the events and people involved in the rescue of 10,000 children from Nazi territories, and what happened after the war. Official tie-in to the Warner Brothers documentary. First hand account of the extraordinary rescue mission of 10,000 children before the outbreak of World War II. For nine months before the outbreak of World War II, Britain conducted an extraordinary rescue mission. It opened its doors to over 10,000 endangered children, 90 percent of them Jewish, from Germany, Austria, and Czechoslovakia. These children were taken into foster homes and hostels in Britain, expecting eventually to be reunited with their parents. Most of the children never saw their families again. Into the Arms of Strangers recounts the remarkable story of this rescue operation, known as the Kindertransport, and its dramatic impact on the lives of the children who were saved. The book is the companion to the feature-length documentary which was released in the theatres by Warner Bros. in Fall 2000. It contains stories in their own words from the child survivors, rescuers, parents, and foster parents. They recount, in harrowing detail, the effects of the Nazi's reign of terror, the horror of Kristallnacht, the agonizing decision by the parents to send their children away, the journey, the difficulties of adjustment in Britain, the outbreak of war, and the children's tragic discovery afterward that most of their parents had perished in concentration camps. The stories are heartbreaking, but also inspiring. These are the stories of those who survived with the help of others; they are stories about the strength and resolve of children; and most astonishing, these are stories not yet heard about the Holocaust.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
DS135 .G5 A1435 2000 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001698216

"Based on the feature-length documentary film from Warner Bros. Pictures"--Cover.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 283-286).

When the bough breaks -- The 9th of November -- A light in the darkness -- Last goodbyes -- Into the arms of strangers -- A thousand kisses -- On the shoulders of children -- War and deportation -- Somewhere to belong -- None to comfort them -- Living with the past -- In memory of Sylva Avramovici Oppenheimer, 1928-1993.

Chronicles the events and people involved in the rescue of 10,000 children from Nazi territories, and what happened after the war. Official tie-in to the Warner Brothers documentary. First hand account of the extraordinary rescue mission of 10,000 children before the outbreak of World War II. For nine months before the outbreak of World War II, Britain conducted an extraordinary rescue mission. It opened its doors to over 10,000 endangered children, 90 percent of them Jewish, from Germany, Austria, and Czechoslovakia. These children were taken into foster homes and hostels in Britain, expecting eventually to be reunited with their parents. Most of the children never saw their families again. Into the Arms of Strangers recounts the remarkable story of this rescue operation, known as the Kindertransport, and its dramatic impact on the lives of the children who were saved. The book is the companion to the feature-length documentary which was released in the theatres by Warner Bros. in Fall 2000. It contains stories in their own words from the child survivors, rescuers, parents, and foster parents. They recount, in harrowing detail, the effects of the Nazi's reign of terror, the horror of Kristallnacht, the agonizing decision by the parents to send their children away, the journey, the difficulties of adjustment in Britain, the outbreak of war, and the children's tragic discovery afterward that most of their parents had perished in concentration camps. The stories are heartbreaking, but also inspiring. These are the stories of those who survived with the help of others; they are stories about the strength and resolve of children; and most astonishing, these are stories not yet heard about the Holocaust.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Harris, an Academy Award-winning documentary filmmaker (The Long Way Home), and television producer Oppenheimer tell the story of the Kindertransport, a rescue mission undertaken by the British that saved 10,000 predominantly Jewish German, Austrian, and Czech children from the Nazi regime. In a series of Studs Terkel-style interviews, they relate the stories of 18 children, foster parents, and organized of the transport. The text is arrangers chronologically, with each section telling the story of one person to illustrate how the rescue mission worked, from the events preceding the children's departure for England to their lives today. This is an effective and compelling way of preserving history. Although much has been written already about the transport, the diversity of the participants' experiences gives a better feel for this amazing rescue and makes for especially fascinating reading. This book is a companion to the September 2000 documentary film of the same name. Highly recommended for public and academic libraries and essential for special Holocaust collections.DJill Jaracz, MLIS, Chicago (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Mark Jonathan Harris , a Harvard graduate, is the two-time Academy Award winner, most recently for the 1997 Best Feature-Length Documentary, "The Long Way Home." He is a Professor and former Chair of the Production Department of the USC School of Cinema/Television. He is also a journalist and author of five award-winning children's novels.</p> <p> Deborah Oppenheimer is the president of Mohawk Productions, a production company at Warner Bros. She is the executive producer of the television programs, "The Drew Carey Show" and "Norm" and two new upcoming shows for the WB. Her mother was a Kindertransport survivor.</p>

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