Signaling goodness : social rules and public choice / Phillip J. Nelson and Kenneth V. Greene.

By: Nelson, Phillip J, 1929-Contributor(s): Greene, Kenneth VMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Economics, cognition, and society: Publisher: Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c2003Description: 261 p. ; 24 cmISBN: 047211347X (alk. paper); 9780472113477 (alk. paper)Subject(s): Charities | Altruism | Social norms | Social perception | Political sociology | Public interestAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Signaling goodness.DDC classification: 361.2/5 LOC classification: HV31 | .N45 2003Other classification: 71.51
Contents:
Charity and evolution -- Charity and reciprocity -- Political charity -- Political positions and imitative behavior -- Goodness -- Activism -- A study of political positions -- The growth of government -- Environmental policy.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Longview campus
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HV31 .N45 2003 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001708759

Includes bibliographical references (p. 241-251) and index.

Charity and evolution -- Charity and reciprocity -- Political charity -- Political positions and imitative behavior -- Goodness -- Activism -- A study of political positions -- The growth of government -- Environmental policy.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Binghamton University economists Nelson and Greene advance our understanding of social behavior and positions that individuals take with respect to voting, donating to charities, support for the environment, participation in community organizations, advocacy for governmental expenditures for health and day care, and compassion for the poor. They assert (with theoretical models and empirical work) that enhancing one's own reputation for trustworthiness and conscience--that is, signaling--to neighbors, friends, and colleagues, is the principal motivation in this regard, rather than treating such seemingly unselfish acts as pure altruism, as the economist's standard assumptions and explanations would do. In their view, "political correctness" is simply a logical byproduct and application of how public policy is influenced by attempts to signal. This book falls into the classification of what economists and political scientists call the theory of public choice, as well as under the headings of sociobiology, bioeconomics, or sociological economics. Although equations, jargon, and econometric results make for tough going in parts, this book is well worth pondering. Nelson and Greene have not ended many arguments, but with this important volume they have certainly upped the level of discourse and provided substantial bases for debating these very important societal issues. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Public and academic library collections, lower-division undergraduate through professionals. A. R. Sanderson University of Chicago

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.