Normal view MARC view ISBD view

A cultural history of pregnancy : pregnancy, medicine, and culture, 1750-2000 / Clare Hanson.

By: Hanson, Clare.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2004Description: viii, 214 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 033398644X (cloth); 9780333986448 (cloth).Subject(s): Pregnancy -- Social aspects -- Great Britain -- History | Pregnancy -- Great Britain -- Psychological aspects -- History | Obstetrics -- Great Britain -- HistoryDDC classification: 618.2 | 306.461082 Other classification: 71.33 | 44.92
Contents:
Advice to the fair sex -- Moral physiology -- Mothering the race -- Mass production -- Reproductive futures.
Review: "This study makes an important contribution to the exploration of the relationship between medicine and culture. Drawing on a wide range of sources, including obstetric texts, advice books for women, medico-social texts, literature and popular culture, Clare Hanson explores the changing ways in which pregnancy has been interpreted and understood over the last 250 years. A number of influential but neglected concepts which have inflected the experience of pregnancy are brought to light and examined critically: these include maternal impressions, the 'insanity of pregnancy', eugenic motherhood and ectogenesis. The book thus uncovers a history of ideas which have shaped both the subjective experience and the medical management of pregnancy. In particular, it reveals the changing understanding of the relationship between mother and foetus, which was construed in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in terms of harmony (the 'one flesh' model of pregnancy) but which has increasingly come to be viewed in terms of physiological (and ethical) conflict and competition." "Hanson's book will be of interest to students and scholars in women's studies, gender and cultural studies and the cultural history of science, as well as the general reader."--Jacket.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
RG556 .H36 2004 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001706647
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
RG493.5.R33 .R36 1998 Computer vision system for mammography : RG518.G7 E25 1982 Obstetrics and gynaecology in Tudor and Stuart England / RG518.U5 W47 1977 Lying-in : RG556 .H36 2004 A cultural history of pregnancy : RG558.7 .B474 2005 Motherwell maternity fitness plan / RG850 .K78 1986 Postpartum depression : RG951 .L89 2005 Delmar's maternal-infant nursing care plans /

Includes bibliographical references (p. 176-208) and index.

Advice to the fair sex -- Moral physiology -- Mothering the race -- Mass production -- Reproductive futures.

"This study makes an important contribution to the exploration of the relationship between medicine and culture. Drawing on a wide range of sources, including obstetric texts, advice books for women, medico-social texts, literature and popular culture, Clare Hanson explores the changing ways in which pregnancy has been interpreted and understood over the last 250 years. A number of influential but neglected concepts which have inflected the experience of pregnancy are brought to light and examined critically: these include maternal impressions, the 'insanity of pregnancy', eugenic motherhood and ectogenesis. The book thus uncovers a history of ideas which have shaped both the subjective experience and the medical management of pregnancy. In particular, it reveals the changing understanding of the relationship between mother and foetus, which was construed in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in terms of harmony (the 'one flesh' model of pregnancy) but which has increasingly come to be viewed in terms of physiological (and ethical) conflict and competition." "Hanson's book will be of interest to students and scholars in women's studies, gender and cultural studies and the cultural history of science, as well as the general reader."--Jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Hanson (English, Loughborough Univ.) investigates how the images, myths, and facts about the understanding and experience of pregnancy have changed in Britain during the past 250 years. The author draws on a wide range of historical and modern sources, including obstetric and midwifery books, advice books for women, medico-social texts, literary texts, popular fiction, and visual images. This book discusses the development and rise of obstetric medicine and the subsequent decline of midwifery. It outlines the major demographic changes in fertility and the decline of household size as populations moved from rural areas to cities. It covers the evolution of various models of the relationship between mother and unborn child (symbiosis, parasitism, and competition). Lastly, it describes the growth of reproductive technology, from the discovery of the stethoscope used to monitor the heartbeat of the fetus to genetic engineering and the possible cloning of humans. This well-written, well-researched, and highly analytical book nicely captures the tension between the interrelationship of medicine and culture in defining society's changing views of pregnancy. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, and scholars. R. M. Mullner University of Illinois at Chicago

Author notes provided by Syndetics

CLARE HANSON is Professor of English at Loughborough University. She has published widely on women's writing and on nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature, and her books include Katherine Mansfield (co-author), Short Stories and Short Fictions, 1880-1980, Virginia Woolf and most recently a study of the woman's novel, Hysterical Fictions (Palgrave Macmillan, 2000).

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.