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Any friend of the movement : networking for birth control, 1920-1940 / Jimmy Elaine Wilkinson Meyer.

By: Meyer, Jimmy Elaine Wilkinson.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Women & health (Columbus, Ohio): Publisher: Columbus : Ohio State University Press, c2004Description: xxii, 296 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0814209548 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780814209547 (hardcover : alk. paper); 0814290345 (CD-ROM); 9780814290347 (CD-ROM).Subject(s): Birth control -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Maternal Health Association of Cleveland, Ohio | Birth control clinics -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Any friend of the movement.DDC classification: 363.9/6/09730904
Contents:
Radical roots -- Nagging and networking -- Heir conditioning -- "Hubby and I think it's swell" -- Friends of the movement -- A new point of view.
Review: "In the 1920s, a few Cleveland women perceived a need for reliable birth control. They believed that health and social service professionals denied women, especially poor and working-class women, critical health care information. Any Friend of the Movement tells the story of these women, their actions, and the organization they created - the direct forerunner of a modern Planned Parenthood affiliate. The disparate threads of this particular tale include the suicide of a pregnant woman, the gift of a bereaved inventor, smuggling contraceptive supplies across state lines, and sponsoring ice skating galas to fund the work." "Any Friend of the Movement breaks new ground in the history of birth control activism in North America. Meyer argues that private philanthropy and voluntary action on the part of clinics like the Maternal Health Association (MHA) and their clients vitalized the larger movement at its roots and pushed it forward."--BOOK JACKET.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 247-270) and index.

Radical roots -- Nagging and networking -- Heir conditioning -- "Hubby and I think it's swell" -- Friends of the movement -- A new point of view.

"In the 1920s, a few Cleveland women perceived a need for reliable birth control. They believed that health and social service professionals denied women, especially poor and working-class women, critical health care information. Any Friend of the Movement tells the story of these women, their actions, and the organization they created - the direct forerunner of a modern Planned Parenthood affiliate. The disparate threads of this particular tale include the suicide of a pregnant woman, the gift of a bereaved inventor, smuggling contraceptive supplies across state lines, and sponsoring ice skating galas to fund the work." "Any Friend of the Movement breaks new ground in the history of birth control activism in North America. Meyer argues that private philanthropy and voluntary action on the part of clinics like the Maternal Health Association (MHA) and their clients vitalized the larger movement at its roots and pushed it forward."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Reproductive control has drastically impacted women's lives in modern times. Independent scholar Meyer examines the files of the Maternal Health Association of Cleveland, which operated from 1928 until its absorption into Planned Parenthood in 1942. Her aim is to see how the roots were established that supported a movement deemed both illegal and immoral by portions of the community. She argues that by networking in ways that incorporated the founders' families and friends, social elites, the medical profession, and Western Reserve University, the clinic established its legitimacy within the community. Utilizing rare letters from clients, Meyer also demonstrates how clinic users provided invaluable support for the clinic and tried to shape its functions. Her balanced account places the clinic's efforts within the largest history of birth control, and notes that the clinic's desire for respectability affected its outreach, and that it reflected some racial, class, and gender biases. This well-researched and fascinating book offers valuable insights into social change and reform networks in the 20th century, as well as women's reproductive history. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Research libraries, upper-division undergraduates and above. P. F. Field Ohio University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jimmy Elaine Wilkinson Meyer is assistant editor of Wooster, the magazine for alumni and friends of the College of Wooster

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