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Dear senator : a memoir by the daughter of Strom Thurmond / Essie Mae Washington-Williams and William Stadiem.

By: Washington-Williams, Essie Mae, 1925-.
Contributor(s): Stadiem, William.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Regan Books, c2005Edition: 1st ed.Description: 223 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0060760958 (alk. paper); 9780060760953 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Thurmond, Strom, 1902-2003 -- Family | Washington-Williams, Essie Mae, 1925- | Thurmond, Strom, 1902-2003 -- Relations with women | Thurmond, Strom, 1902-2003 -- Relations with African Americans | Daughters -- United States -- Biography | Racially mixed people -- United States -- Biography | Legislators -- Family relationships -- United States -- Case studies | Southern States -- Race relations -- Case studiesDDC classification: 973.9/092 | B
Contents:
Summer of '38 -- Southern exposure -- Reconstruction -- Life with father -- The governor's daughter -- Heart of Dixie -- Dear senator -- Days of rage -- Reckoning.
Summary: The illegitimate daughter of the late Senator Strom Thurmond breaks her lifelong silence. Her father, the longtime senator from South Carolina, was once the nation's leading voice for racial segregation; he mounted a filibuster against the Civil Rights Act of 1957 -- in the name of saving the South from "mongrelization." Her mother was Carrie Butler, a black teenager who worked as a maid on the Thurmond family's South Carolina plantation. The memoir reveals a brave young woman who struggled with the discrepancy between the father she knew -- financially generous, supportive of her education, even affectionate -- and the old Southern politician who refused to acknowledge their relationship in public.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E748 .T58 W37 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001709500

The illegitimate daughter of the late Senator Strom Thurmond breaks her lifelong silence. Her father, the longtime senator from South Carolina, was once the nation's leading voice for racial segregation; he mounted a filibuster against the Civil Rights Act of 1957 -- in the name of saving the South from "mongrelization." Her mother was Carrie Butler, a black teenager who worked as a maid on the Thurmond family's South Carolina plantation. The memoir reveals a brave young woman who struggled with the discrepancy between the father she knew -- financially generous, supportive of her education, even affectionate -- and the old Southern politician who refused to acknowledge their relationship in public.

Summer of '38 -- Southern exposure -- Reconstruction -- Life with father -- The governor's daughter -- Heart of Dixie -- Dear senator -- Days of rage -- Reckoning.

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Library Journal Review

Washington-Williams was 13 years old when she learned that her mother was not the person who had raised her, but her "mother's" beautiful sister. A few years later, while visiting her mother's family in South Carolina, her life was rocked by the even more astounding revelation that her father was Strom Thurmond. Since Washington-Williams believed herself to be African American, finding that her father was a powerful white attorney in the decidedly racist South was nothing short of earth-shaking. Her reaction was to devour as much information about America's racial history as she could find in her Coatesville, PA, public library and come to terms with her heritage. With the help of Stadiem (coauthor, Marilyn Monroe Confidential), Washington-Williams recounts her numerous private visits with her father and how she was able to accommodate his racist views as South Carolina's governor and senator with the kind and generous treatment she received from him throughout his political career. Her personal history is one of accomplishment as a mother, teacher, and guidance counselor but also of a complex and secret relationship with a father who never publicly acknowledged his biracial daughter. Her story is extremely well told; highly recommended for public and academic libraries.-Jill Ortner, SUNY at Buffalo Libs. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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