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Blink : the power of thinking without thinking / Malcolm Gladwell.

By: Gladwell, Malcolm, 1963-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Little, Brown and Co., 2005Edition: 1st ed.Description: viii, 277 p. : ports. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 0316172324; 9780316172325.Subject(s): Decision making | IntuitionDDC classification: 153.4/4 Other classification: 77.33
Contents:
The statue that didn't look right -- The theory of thin slices : how a little bit of knowledge goes a long way -- The locked door : the secret life of snap decisions -- The Warren Harding error : why we fall for tall, dark, and handsome men -- Paul Van Riper's big victory : creating structure for spontaneity -- Kenna's dilemma : the right-and wrong-way to ask people what they want -- Seven seconds in the Bronx : the delicate art of mind-reading -- Conclusion : listening with your eyes : the lessons of blink.
Summary: How do we think without thinking, seem to make choices in an instant--in the blink of an eye--that actually aren't as simple as they seem? Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others? Drawing on cutting-edge neuroscience and psychology, the author reveals that great decision makers aren't those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables.
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Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
BF448 .G53 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001727940
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
BF448 .G53 2005 c.2 (Browse shelf) 2 Available 0000002151264

Includes bibliographical references (p. [255]-262) and index.

The statue that didn't look right -- The theory of thin slices : how a little bit of knowledge goes a long way -- The locked door : the secret life of snap decisions -- The Warren Harding error : why we fall for tall, dark, and handsome men -- Paul Van Riper's big victory : creating structure for spontaneity -- Kenna's dilemma : the right-and wrong-way to ask people what they want -- Seven seconds in the Bronx : the delicate art of mind-reading -- Conclusion : listening with your eyes : the lessons of blink.

How do we think without thinking, seem to make choices in an instant--in the blink of an eye--that actually aren't as simple as they seem? Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others? Drawing on cutting-edge neuroscience and psychology, the author reveals that great decision makers aren't those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The title preceding Outliers, which placed No. 4 here; read by the author. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Though it is interesting and well written, Gladwell's book on first impressions leaves the academic reader with more questions than answers. In and of itself, this is mere quibble; the problem is that Gladwell makes several significant claims but fails to support them. He offers anecdotal evidence but does not cite the experimental data in a way that allows the reader to determine the validity of his interpretations. For example, he contends that snap decisions can be either incredibly accurate or tragically wrong, but the quotations he offers in support of this idea, though fascinating, are not convincing. Further, he offers two main reasons for distortions of snap decisions: emotional arousal and time pressure. Scientific studies demonstrate that emotional arousal and, more important, events threatening to the self would lead to delayed reactions and that events related to activated need states would lead to major distortions in snap decisions. This book certainly deserves a place on The New York Times best-seller list because Gladwell raises an important question. Its usefulness in an academic setting is questionable, given all the above. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Comprehensive academic collections; public libraries. M. W. York University of New Haven

Author notes provided by Syndetics

In 2005, Time named Malcolm Gladwell one of its 100 most influential people. He is the author of three books, each of which reached number one on the New York Times Best Seller list. They are: The Tipping Point, Blink, and Outliers. His fourth book, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures was published in 2009. <p> He is a is a British-born Canadian journalist and author. Gladwell was a reporter for the Washington Post from 1987 to 1996, working first as a science writer and then as New York City bureau chief. Since 1996, he has been a staff writer for The New Yorker. He graduated with a degree in history from the University of Toronto's Trinity College in 1984. <p> (Publisher Provided) Malcolm Gladwell, non-fiction writer and journalist, was born in England on Sept 3, 1963. He was raised in rural Ontario and graduated from the University of Toronto, Trinity College, with a degree in History. <p> Gladwell was previously a business and science reporter for the Washington Post and is currently a staff writer with the New Yorker magazine. He is well-known for his many New York Times bestselling books: Blink, The Tipping Point, Outliers, What the Dog Saw, and David and Goliath. His writing is often a product of sociology and psychology with implications for the social sciences and business. Gladwell became a successful public speaker after writing his bestselling books. <p> In 2005, Time Magazine named Gladwell one of its 100 most influential people. Gladwell's most famous quote comes from his book, Outliers; he states that "It takes about 10,000 hours of practice to become an expert..." at any competition or task. <p> Gladwell was appointed to the Order of Canada on June 30, 2011. Gladwell describes himself as a Christian. He was raised in the Mennonite tradition, and wandered away from his Christian roots when he moved to New York, only to rediscover his faith during the writing of David and Goliath and through his encounter with Wilma Derksen. In 2005, Gladwell commanded approximately $45,000 for his speaking fee. His books include: Outliers, Blink, What the Dog Saw, and David and Goliath. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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