The vanishing newspaper : saving journalism in the information age / Philip Meyer.

By: Meyer, PhilipMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2004Description: 269 p. : ill. ; 24 cmISBN: 0826215610 (alk. paper); 9780826215611 (alk. paper); 0826215688 (alk. paper); 9780826215680 (alk. paper)Subject(s): Journalism -- United States | Journalism -- Economic aspects -- United States | NewspapersAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Vanishing newspaper.DDC classification: 071/.3 LOC classification: PN4867.2 | .M48 2004Other classification: 05.33
Contents:
The influence model -- How newspapers make money -- How advertisers make decisions -- Credibility and influence -- Accuracy in reporting -- Readability -- Do editors matter? -- The last line of defense -- Capacity measures -- How newspapers were captured by Wall Street -- Saving journalism -- What we can do.
Summary: In The Vanishing Newspaper, Philip Meyer offers the newspaper industry a business model for preserving and stabilizing the social responsibility functions of the press in a way that could outlast technology-driven changes in media forms. This "influence model," as it is termed by Meyer, is based on the premise that a newspaper's main product is not news or information, but influence: societal influence, which is not for sale, and commercial influence, which is. Meyer's model explores how the former enhances the value of the latter.
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PN4855 .S3 Discovering the news : PN4858 .B7 1971 Journals and journeymen; PN4864 .M55 1989 The yellow kids : PN4867.2 .M48 2004 The vanishing newspaper : PN4867 .H9 1980 American newspapers in the 1980s / PN4867 .J64 The new journalism; PN4867 .K65 1973 Pressures on the press.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The influence model -- How newspapers make money -- How advertisers make decisions -- Credibility and influence -- Accuracy in reporting -- Readability -- Do editors matter? -- The last line of defense -- Capacity measures -- How newspapers were captured by Wall Street -- Saving journalism -- What we can do.

In The Vanishing Newspaper, Philip Meyer offers the newspaper industry a business model for preserving and stabilizing the social responsibility functions of the press in a way that could outlast technology-driven changes in media forms. This "influence model," as it is termed by Meyer, is based on the premise that a newspaper's main product is not news or information, but influence: societal influence, which is not for sale, and commercial influence, which is. Meyer's model explores how the former enhances the value of the latter.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

A trend to appeal to niche audiences is rendering traditional newspapers obsolete. Despite this assertion, Meyer (journalism, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) devotes most of his book to proving that a traditional, socially responsible newspaper makes good business sense. Drawing on his own and others' research, he argues that there is a positive correlation between newspaper accuracy and reader trust. Even in a chapter that discusses creative responses to the challenges facing the news business, Meyer does not stray from the model of a traditional newspaper reaching out to general readers. He does concede that only the frontline reporters will remain part of the equation in whatever new forms journalism will take. The final chapter is a plea for journalists to develop and enforce professional standards. With the explosion of new media outlets, from satellite radio to web logs, it seems unlikely that the profession will have much luck policing itself. Journalism schools will survive for quite some time, however, and libraries that serve them should consider buying this book.-Susan M. Colowick, Timberland Regional Lib., Tumwater, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Resplendent with vivid examples and analogies that illustrate its concepts and conclusions, this book poses practical suggestions for reviving US journalism. Meyer (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) does not offer a pathway leading back to what he calls the "golden age" of newspapers--i.e., early- to mid-20th century, when monopoly ownership brought huge profit margins and near-universal readership. Instead, he builds on and interprets sociological and statistical studies that shaped the industry over the last half of the 20th century and adds details of his own current research to put forth a new model based on modest profits, quality products, and excellent service. Applying his experience as an editor, trainer, social scientist, professor, and researcher, he scrutinizes all aspects of journalism and proposes a formula for survival--and even success. Meyer's "influence model" is based on practices that create trust among advertisers and readers alike. Addressing such factors as readability levels, editorial vigor, staffing ratios, reportorial accuracy, and business patterns, he formulates standards that traditional journalists can apply as they adapt to changing technologies and evolving consumer demands. An appendix explaining data analysis for correlation-based statistics will help those who lack research experience. ^BSumming Up: Essential. Collections supporting study of journalism, especially newspapers; upper-division undergraduates and above. L. Loomis SUNY Oswego

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Philip Meyer is Professor Emeritus of Journalism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the author or editor of a number of books, including Assessing Public Journalism and Letters from the Editor: Lessons on Journalism and Life by William F. Woo.

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