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The Oxford dictionary of quotations / edited by Elizabeth Knowles.

Contributor(s): Knowles, Elizabeth (Elizabeth M.).
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2004Edition: 6th ed.Description: xxvi, 1140 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0198607202; 9780198607205.Subject(s): Quotations | Quotations, English | Quotations -- Translations into EnglishDDC classification: 082 Other classification: 01.29 Available also online via the Internet.
Contents:
Special categories : Advertising slogans -- Borrowed titles -- Catchphrases -- Closing lines -- Epitaphs -- Film lines -- Film titles -- Last words -- Military sayings, slogans, and songs -- Misquotations -- Mottoes -- Newspaper headlines and leaders -- Official advice -- Opening lines -- Political slogans and songs -- Prayers -- Sayings -- Slogans -- Songs, spirituals, and shanties -- Taglines for films -- Telegrams -- Toasts.
Review: "For over 50 years, Oxford's Dictionary Department has been collecting, sourcing, researching, and authenticating quotations on an international scale. In doing so, it has created a rich language resource and developed thorough and reliable editorial procedures."--BOOK JACKET.
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Includes index.

Available also online via the Internet.

Index.

Special categories : Advertising slogans -- Borrowed titles -- Catchphrases -- Closing lines -- Epitaphs -- Film lines -- Film titles -- Last words -- Military sayings, slogans, and songs -- Misquotations -- Mottoes -- Newspaper headlines and leaders -- Official advice -- Opening lines -- Political slogans and songs -- Prayers -- Sayings -- Slogans -- Songs, spirituals, and shanties -- Taglines for films -- Telegrams -- Toasts.

"For over 50 years, Oxford's Dictionary Department has been collecting, sourcing, researching, and authenticating quotations on an international scale. In doing so, it has created a rich language resource and developed thorough and reliable editorial procedures."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In one of his elegies, Rilke proclaimed, "Who has not sat nervously before the stage curtain of his heart." In a short story, Anton Chekhov wrote, "If a lot of cures are suggested for a disease, it means that the disease is incurable." This is but a sampling of the kinds of quotations one finds in this newly revised Oxford classic. With its more than 20,000 quotations, organized alphabetically by author's last name, the dictionary will both educate and entertain anyone who appreciates other people's wisdom or, alternately, enjoys discovering statements that are downright dumb (e.g., Bill Clinton's comment about smoking pot). Since the publication of the fifth edition in 1999, so much has been said by such omnipresent figures as Saddam Hussein, George W. Bush, and Martha Stewart that libraries will definitely want an update, though the hundreds of new entries reach back to older times as well. Mirela Roncevic (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

In its latest edition, ODQ's contents range from the classics to the 2002 State of the Union address. Compared to the better-known Bartlett's Familiar Quotations (17th ed., 2002), ODQ shows statistical similarities. Bartlett's runs over 1,400 pages with more than 20,000 quotations; ODQ contains approximately the same number of quotes on 1,140 pages. Their contents and arrangement differ enough, however, to demonstrate that a single quotation book is insufficient. ODQ's entries are arranged alphabetically by author with each author briefly identified (e.g., "Australian feminist," "English poet"). Bartlett's chooses a chronological arrangement, which necessitates using the author index to locate quotes by a particular person. Both provide a keyword in context index (simply called "Index" in both). ODQ includes 22 special categories inserted into the author arrangement (e.g., advertising slogans, last words, official advice). ODQ and Bartlett's are each solid choices, and most libraries will find it useful to own fairly recent editions of both. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. College and university libraries. P. Palmer University of Memphis

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Elizabeth Knowles is Publishing Manager for Oxford Quotations Dictionaries and is a historical lexicographer, having previously worked on the 4th edition of the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary.

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