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One vast winter count : the Native American West before Lewis and Clark / Colin G. Calloway.

By: Calloway, Colin G. (Colin Gordon), 1953-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: History of the American West: Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2003Description: xvii, 631 p. : ill., map ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0803215304 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780803215306 (cloth : alk. paper); 0803264658 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780803264656 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Indians of North America -- West (U.S.) -- HistoryDDC classification: 978/.01 Other classification: 15.85 Also available via the World Wide Web.
Contents:
The West before 1500. Pioneers ; Singing up a new world -- Invaders south and north, 1500-1730. Sons of the sun and people of the earth ; Rebellions and reconquests ; Calumet and Fleur-de-lys -- Winning and losing the war in the West, 1700-1800. The coming of the centaurs ; People in between and people on the edge ; The killing years -- Epilogue: The slave in the chariot.
Summary: This sweeping account traces the histories of the Native peoples of the American West from their arrival thousands of years ago to the early years of the nineteenth century. Colin G. Calloway depicts Indian country west of the Appalachians to the Pacific, with emphasis on conflict and change. Calloway's narrative includes: the first inhabitants and their early pursuit of big-game animals; the diffusion of corn and how it transformed American Indian life; the Spanish invasion and Indian resistance to Spanish colonialism; French-Indian relations in the heart of the continent; the diffusion of horses and horse culture; the collision of rival European empires and the experiences of Indian peoples whose homelands became imperial borderlands; and the dramatic events between the American Revolution and the arrival of Lewis and Clark. The account ends as a new American nation emerged independent of the British Empire, took over the trans-Mississippi West, and began to expand its own empire based on the concept of liberty and the acquisition of Indian land. This book offers a new look at the early history of the region--a blending of ethnohistory, colonial history, and frontier history. It features Native voices and perspectives; a fluid integration of a wide range of oral and archival sources from across the West; a reconstruction of cultural histories; and balanced consideration of controversial subjects and issues. Calloway offers a glimpse at the lives of generations of Native peoples in a western land soon to be overrun.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Longview campus
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E78 .W5 C35 2003 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001722115
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E78 .W5 C35 2003 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001735380

Includes bibliographical references (p. 569-596) and index.

This sweeping account traces the histories of the Native peoples of the American West from their arrival thousands of years ago to the early years of the nineteenth century. Colin G. Calloway depicts Indian country west of the Appalachians to the Pacific, with emphasis on conflict and change. Calloway's narrative includes: the first inhabitants and their early pursuit of big-game animals; the diffusion of corn and how it transformed American Indian life; the Spanish invasion and Indian resistance to Spanish colonialism; French-Indian relations in the heart of the continent; the diffusion of horses and horse culture; the collision of rival European empires and the experiences of Indian peoples whose homelands became imperial borderlands; and the dramatic events between the American Revolution and the arrival of Lewis and Clark. The account ends as a new American nation emerged independent of the British Empire, took over the trans-Mississippi West, and began to expand its own empire based on the concept of liberty and the acquisition of Indian land. This book offers a new look at the early history of the region--a blending of ethnohistory, colonial history, and frontier history. It features Native voices and perspectives; a fluid integration of a wide range of oral and archival sources from across the West; a reconstruction of cultural histories; and balanced consideration of controversial subjects and issues. Calloway offers a glimpse at the lives of generations of Native peoples in a western land soon to be overrun.

The West before 1500. Pioneers ; Singing up a new world -- Invaders south and north, 1500-1730. Sons of the sun and people of the earth ; Rebellions and reconquests ; Calumet and Fleur-de-lys -- Winning and losing the war in the West, 1700-1800. The coming of the centaurs ; People in between and people on the edge ; The killing years -- Epilogue: The slave in the chariot.

Also available via the World Wide Web.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Calloway (history, Dartmouth) draws on tribal histories, anthropology, and archaeology, as well as traditional historical sources, to present this useful and insightful overview of vibrant nations actively charting their futures in the time of great change and tremendous challenge before Lewis and Clark's Corps of Discovery set forth in 1803. In addition to corn agriculture and its impact upon prehistoric populations, the author discusses the later historic shift from bow and arrow to firearms, the incorporation of horses into Plains Indian life, and the increased acquisition of European trade goods and culture. Colonial European powers and their interaction with Native populations, including the Spanish colonies in the Pueblos and California and the French and British rivalry, are explored in depth, though throughout the Native nations remain the primary focus. Calloway's balanced treatment of a topic so easily given to polemics is welcome indeed. Highly recommended for academic and public libraries.-Nathan E. Bender, Buffalo Bill Historical Ctr., Cody, WY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Featuring more than 400 pages of text and 200 pages of endnotes, bibliography, and index, this massive work is not only commanding in size, but also in breadth of coverage--the American West before Lewis and Clark's 1803 expedition. Calloway's West begins with Lewis and Clark's West--the Appalachian Mountains, not the 100th meridian, not the Rio Grande, not the Rocky Mountains. Calloway's history begins not with the coming of Europeans, nor does it feature the now-obligatory coverage of "prehistoric" America of 40,000 years, give or take a few millennia, compressed into 30 pages. Perhaps historians of the West will come to realize that Native American history before the arrival of Europeans is as important as what happened after their arrival. Calloway (Dartmouth College) synthesizes the history of the West while maintaining all of its majesty and complexity. It is a shame, however, that the 15 maps were not more detailed, and that there are not more of them. This book is the first of a projected six-volume history of the West, and readers can only hope that Calloway's accomplishments here will be replicated in subsequent volumes. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All public and academic libraries. L. Graves South Plains College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Colin G. Calloway is the Samson Occom Professor of Native American Studies, professor of history, and chair of the Native American studies program at Dartmouth College. He is the coeditor of Germans and Indians: Fantasies, Projections, Encounters (Nebraska 2002) and the author of many works, including New Worlds for All: Indians, Europeans, and the Remaking of Early America.

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