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The new division of labor : how computers are creating the next job market / Frank Levy and Richard J. Murnane.

By: Levy, Frank, 1941-.
Contributor(s): Murnane, Richard J.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Princeton, N.J. : Russell Sage Foundation ; Princeton University Press, c2004Description: ix, 174 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0691119724 (cl. : alk. paper); 9780691119724 (cl. : alk. paper); 0691124027 (pbk.); 9780691124025 (pbk.).Subject(s): Labor supply -- Effect of technological innovations on | Labor supply -- Effect of automation on | Computers -- Social aspects | Employees -- Effect of automation on | Automation -- Economic aspectsDDC classification: 331.1 Other classification: 83.61 | 85.64
Contents:
New divisions of labor -- Why people still matter -- How computers change work and pay -- Expert thinking -- Complex communication -- Enabling skills -- Computers and the teaching of skills -- Standards-based education reform in the computer age -- The next ten years.
Review: "As the current recession ends, many workers will not be returning to the jobs they once held -- those jobs are gone. In The New Division of Labor, Frank Levy and Richard Murnane show how computers are changing the employment landscape and how the right kinds of education can ease the transition to the new job market. The book tells stories of people at work -- a high-end financial advisor, a customer service representative, a pair of successful chefs, a cardiologist, an automotive mechanic, the author Victor Hugo, floor traders in a London financial exchange. The authors merge these stories with insights from cognitive science, computer science, and economics to show how computers are enhancing productivity in many jobs even as they eliminate other jobs -- both directly and by sending work offshore. At greatest risk are jobs that can be expressed in programmable rules -- blue collar, clerical, and similar work that requires moderate skills and used to pay middle-class wages. The loss of these jobs leaves a growing division between those who can and cannot earn a good living in the computerized economy. Left unchecked, the division threatens the nation's democratic institutions. The nation's challenge is to recognize this division and to prepare the population for the high-wage/high-skilled jobs that are rapidly growing in number -- jobs involving extensive problem solving and interpersonal communication. Using detailed examples -- a second grade classroom, an IBM managerial training program, Cisco Networking Academies -- the authors describe how these skills can be taught and how our adjustment to the computerized workplace can begin in earnest. Book jacket."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HD6331 .L48 2004 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001722743

Includes bibliographical references and index.

New divisions of labor -- Why people still matter -- How computers change work and pay -- Expert thinking -- Complex communication -- Enabling skills -- Computers and the teaching of skills -- Standards-based education reform in the computer age -- The next ten years.

"As the current recession ends, many workers will not be returning to the jobs they once held -- those jobs are gone. In The New Division of Labor, Frank Levy and Richard Murnane show how computers are changing the employment landscape and how the right kinds of education can ease the transition to the new job market. The book tells stories of people at work -- a high-end financial advisor, a customer service representative, a pair of successful chefs, a cardiologist, an automotive mechanic, the author Victor Hugo, floor traders in a London financial exchange. The authors merge these stories with insights from cognitive science, computer science, and economics to show how computers are enhancing productivity in many jobs even as they eliminate other jobs -- both directly and by sending work offshore. At greatest risk are jobs that can be expressed in programmable rules -- blue collar, clerical, and similar work that requires moderate skills and used to pay middle-class wages. The loss of these jobs leaves a growing division between those who can and cannot earn a good living in the computerized economy. Left unchecked, the division threatens the nation's democratic institutions. The nation's challenge is to recognize this division and to prepare the population for the high-wage/high-skilled jobs that are rapidly growing in number -- jobs involving extensive problem solving and interpersonal communication. Using detailed examples -- a second grade classroom, an IBM managerial training program, Cisco Networking Academies -- the authors describe how these skills can be taught and how our adjustment to the computerized workplace can begin in earnest. Book jacket."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The last 25 years have been ones of extraordinary change. In a dynamic, high-tech, computer-based world, with decreasing costs of communications and transportation accelerating the pace of globalization, the gulf between rich and poor--or more appropriately between the skilled and unskilled--has widened in terms of opportunity and income. Levy and Murnane, two well-respected economists with interests and expertise in neighboring fields as well, examine how computers have changed and will continue to change the occupational distribution and skill requirements both at home and internationally. They lay out labor-market expectations with regard to the ability to solve problems and communicate with others (what they term "expert thinking" and "complex communication," respectively); how these skills must be taught and the educational reforms necessary for that to happen; and the inherent risks to democratic societies that fail to implement these reforms. These messages are delivered through the use of actual accounts of people at work, descriptions of and data on how computers affect work and remuneration, and blueprints for change. A readable, timely, and highly relevant volume, one that will certainly not end debates but should stimulate thinking and discussions in the worlds of business, education, and public policy. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. General readers, students at all levels, and professionals. A. R. Sanderson University of Chicago

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Frank Levy is the Daniel Rose Professor of Urban Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology <br> An economist, Richard Murmane is Juliana W. and William Foss Thompson Professor of Education and Society at Harvard University

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