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Inventing Los Alamos : the growth of an atomic community / Jon Hunner.

By: Hunner, Jon.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2004Description: x, 288 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0806136340 (alk. paper); 9780806136349 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Los Alamos (N.M.) -- History -- 20th century | Los Alamos (N.M.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century | Los Alamos (N.M.) -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Families -- New Mexico -- Los Alamos -- History -- 20th century | Community life -- New Mexico -- Los Alamos -- History -- 20th century | Nuclear weapons -- Social aspects -- New Mexico -- Los Alamos -- History -- 20th century | Nuclear weapons -- Social aspects -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Cold War -- Social aspects -- New Mexico -- Los Alamos | Cold War -- Social aspects -- United States | Los Alamos (N.M.) History 20th century | Los Alamos (N.M.) Social life and customs 20th century | Los Alamos (N.M.) Social conditions 20th century Los Alamos (NM) / Los Alamos National Laboratory Kernwaffe Ost-West-Konflikt Soziale Situation Familie GesellschaftDDC classification: 978.9/58053
Contents:
Rendezvous at Site Y : the instant city -- Fishing in the desert with Fat Man : civic tension, atomic explosion -- Postwar Los Alamos : exodus, new growth, and invisible danger -- Los Alamos transformed : federal largesse and Red challenge -- A Cold War community up in arms : competition and conformity -- Toward normalizing Los Alamos : cracking the gates -- Atomic city in a hill : legacy and continuing research.
Review: "Much has been written about scientific developments at Los Alamos, but until this book little has been said about the community that fostered them. Using government records and the personal accounts of early residents, Inventing Los Alamos traces the evolution of the town during its first fifteen years as home to a national laboratory and documents the momentous events that created the town, the lives of the families who lived there, and the impact of this small community on the Atomic Age."--BOOK JACKET.
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F804 .L6 H86 2004 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001723303

Includes bibliographical references (p. 265-276) and index.

Rendezvous at Site Y : the instant city -- Fishing in the desert with Fat Man : civic tension, atomic explosion -- Postwar Los Alamos : exodus, new growth, and invisible danger -- Los Alamos transformed : federal largesse and Red challenge -- A Cold War community up in arms : competition and conformity -- Toward normalizing Los Alamos : cracking the gates -- Atomic city in a hill : legacy and continuing research.

"Much has been written about scientific developments at Los Alamos, but until this book little has been said about the community that fostered them. Using government records and the personal accounts of early residents, Inventing Los Alamos traces the evolution of the town during its first fifteen years as home to a national laboratory and documents the momentous events that created the town, the lives of the families who lived there, and the impact of this small community on the Atomic Age."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Relying primarily on public archival documents and personal interviews, Hunner (director, Public History Program, New Mexico State Univ.) has written a model study that describes and analyzes the creation and growth of Los Alamos, NM, between 1942 and 1957. The author recounts the early growth of this unique small city, obviously the result of wartime necessity, and the difficulty families had in creating a community environment in such isolation. Due to the bomb and the continued need for nuclear research, Los Alamos was a thriving community by 1957. Its uniqueness lay partly in the fact that it was largely financed by the federal government, which poured billions of dollars into making the city an appealing place to live. Although much of the population left at the end of WW II, people who were qualified for high-paying prestigious jobs and attracted to a beautiful area with excellent schools and amenities quickly replaced them. This fine study ends when the government tore down the fences to make Los Alamos a more "normal" city even though many residents feared an ensuing loss of safety. Despite Hunner's only partially successful attempt to apply the theoretically au courant concept of "code switching" to this study, the book belongs in all major libraries. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. A. O. Edmonds Ball State University

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