A nation under our feet : Black political struggles in the rural South, from slavery to the great migration / Steven Hahn.

By: Hahn, Steven, 1951-Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2003Description: viii, [16] p. of plates, 610 p. : ill. ; 25 cmISBN: 0674011694 (alk. paper); 9780674011694 (alk. paper); 067401765X (pbk.); 9780674017658 (pbk.)Subject(s): African Americans -- Southern States -- Politics and government -- 19th century | African Americans -- Southern States -- Politics and government -- 20th century | African Americans -- Social conditions -- To 1964 | Southern States -- Politics and government -- 1865-1950 | Southern States -- Race relations | Southern States -- Rural conditionsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Nation under our feet.; Online version:: Nation under our feet.DDC classification: 975/.0049607301734 LOC classification: E185.2 | .H15 2003Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Prologue: Looking out from slavery -- pt 1. "The Jacobins of the country". -- Of chains and threads -- "The choked voice of a race at last unloosed -- Of rumors and revelations -- pt 2. To build a new Jerusalem. -- Reconstructing the body politic -- " A society turned bottomside up" -- Of paramilitary politics -- pt 3. The unvanquished. -- The education of Henry Adams -- Of ballots and biracialism -- The valley and the shadows -- Epilogue: "Up, you mighty race".
Awards: Pulitzer Prize, History, 2004.Summary: This is the epic story of how African-Americans, in the six decades following slavery, transformed themselves into a political people-an embryonic black nation. As Steven Hahn demonstrates, rural African-Americans were central political actors in the great events of disunion, emancipation, and nation-building. At the same time, Hahn asks us to think in more expansive ways about the nature and boundaries of politics and political practice. Emphasizing the importance of kinship, labor, and networks of communication, A Nation under Our Feet explores the political relations and sensibilities that developed under slavery and shows how they set the stage for grassroots mobilization. Hahn introduces us to local leaders, and shows how political communities were built, defended, and rebuilt. He also identifies the quest for self-governance as an essential goal of black politics across the rural South, from contests for local power during Reconstruction, to emigrationism, biracial electoral alliances, social separatism, and, eventually, migration. Hahn suggests that Garveyism and other popular forms of black nationalism absorbed and elaborated these earlier struggles, thus linking the first generation of migrants to the urban North with those who remained in the South. He offers a new framework-looking out from slavery-to understand twentieth-century forms of black political consciousness as well as emerging battles for civil rights. It is a powerful story, told here for the first time, and one that presents both an inspiring and a troubling perspective on American democracy. Emphasizing the role of kinship, labor, and networks in the African-American community, the author retraces six generations of black struggles since the end of the Civil War, revealing a "nation" under construction throughout this entire period.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window Awards: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E185.2 .H15 2003 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001723253

Includes bibliographical references (p. [481]-593) and index.

Prologue: Looking out from slavery -- pt 1. "The Jacobins of the country". -- Of chains and threads -- "The choked voice of a race at last unloosed -- Of rumors and revelations -- pt 2. To build a new Jerusalem. -- Reconstructing the body politic -- " A society turned bottomside up" -- Of paramilitary politics -- pt 3. The unvanquished. -- The education of Henry Adams -- Of ballots and biracialism -- The valley and the shadows -- Epilogue: "Up, you mighty race".

This is the epic story of how African-Americans, in the six decades following slavery, transformed themselves into a political people-an embryonic black nation. As Steven Hahn demonstrates, rural African-Americans were central political actors in the great events of disunion, emancipation, and nation-building. At the same time, Hahn asks us to think in more expansive ways about the nature and boundaries of politics and political practice. Emphasizing the importance of kinship, labor, and networks of communication, A Nation under Our Feet explores the political relations and sensibilities that developed under slavery and shows how they set the stage for grassroots mobilization. Hahn introduces us to local leaders, and shows how political communities were built, defended, and rebuilt. He also identifies the quest for self-governance as an essential goal of black politics across the rural South, from contests for local power during Reconstruction, to emigrationism, biracial electoral alliances, social separatism, and, eventually, migration. Hahn suggests that Garveyism and other popular forms of black nationalism absorbed and elaborated these earlier struggles, thus linking the first generation of migrants to the urban North with those who remained in the South. He offers a new framework-looking out from slavery-to understand twentieth-century forms of black political consciousness as well as emerging battles for civil rights. It is a powerful story, told here for the first time, and one that presents both an inspiring and a troubling perspective on American democracy. Emphasizing the role of kinship, labor, and networks in the African-American community, the author retraces six generations of black struggles since the end of the Civil War, revealing a "nation" under construction throughout this entire period.

Pulitzer Prize, History, 2004.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Hahn (Univ. of Pennsylvania) examines the development of African American political culture during its formative years in the last half of the 19th century, arguing that African Americans actively shaped their own political identity during this critical time period in an often overlooked comprehensive grassroots movement. The naissance of black political participation actually began years before the 15th Amendment, as centuries of activism and mobilization during slavery provided the foundation for future African American political efforts. The cultural components of kinship, labor, education, and networks of communication allowed former slaves the organization and solidarity needed to achieve political equality and self-governance. Hahn traces these trends chronologically through slavery, Radical Reconstruction, and the migration of Southern blacks to the North in the 1920s. He provides well-researched examinations of biracial political coalitions and the rise of popular black nationalism (Garveyism). The broad scope of this study and Hahn's ability to articulate the complex characteristics of African American political origins and growth supersedes Eric Foner's seminal work (Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877, CH, Oct'88) or any other more specialized study on the era. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. B. A. Wineman Virginia Military Institute

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Steven Hahn is the Roy F. and Jeanette P. Nichols Professor in American History at the University of Pennsylvania.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.