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Value shift : why companies must merge social and financial imperatives to achieve superior performance / Lynn Sharp Paine.

By: Paine, Lynn Sharp.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : McGraw-Hill, c2003Edition: 1st ed.Description: xv, 302 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0071382399 (alk. paper); 9780071382397 (alk. paper); 0071427333 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780071427333 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Business ethics | Social responsibility of businessDDC classification: 174/.4 | 658.408 LOC classification: HF5387 | .P35 2003HD60.5.U5 | P33 2003Other classification: 85.10
Contents:
The turn to values -- Does ethics pay? -- Time for a reality check -- The corporation's evolving personality -- A higher standard -- The new value proposition -- Performing at a higher level -- A compass for decision making -- The center-driven company.
Summary: Focuses on blending a company's need for profitability with adherence to ethical principles.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HF5387 .P35 2003 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001737501

Includes bibliographical references (p. 257-294) and index.

The turn to values -- Does ethics pay? -- Time for a reality check -- The corporation's evolving personality -- A higher standard -- The new value proposition -- Performing at a higher level -- A compass for decision making -- The center-driven company.

Focuses on blending a company's need for profitability with adherence to ethical principles.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This well-written, relevant, and comprehensive analysis of all aspects of ethics or standards of behavior as they relate to the corporation traces the evolving perception of the corporation as an "amoral" entity in the early 1900s to the current perception of the corporation as a "moral entity" that must demonstrate both financial and moral excellence. Paine (Harvard Business School) discusses the serious contradictions and dilemmas for corporations from the convergence of these criteria and considers the practical aspects of how corporations might deal with them. Cautioning against the tendency to oversimplify an ethical value system by simply developing statements and codes of ethics, she details the complex issues that arise in attempting to implement them, citing examples of companies that failed and succeeded. Paine notes that moral indifference can frequently be quite profitable and that congruence does not always exist between ethical behavior and a corporation's self-interest. She also addresses the critical component of the quality of management decision making, astutely observing that moral analysis is rarely defined as a part of management decision making; she recommends the practical usefulness of the collaborative process of discussion and deliberation as mechanisms for truly engaging managers in moral concerns. A serious, well-researched treatment of the topic. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals. R. Quinn CUNY Bronx Community College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Lynn Sharp Paine , D.Phil., J.D. , is a John G. McLean Professor and at the Harvard Business School. She is a member of The Conference Board's Blue-Ribbon Commission on Public Trust and Private Enterprise, and consults to companies worldwide on leadership and values. Her articles have appeared in Harvard Business Review and other major business journals, and she is the author of the casebook Leadership, Ethics, and Organizational Integrity. </p>

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